Quake 2.NET ported to MS Visual Studio 2005?

Quake 2 was ported to .NET 1.1 a year ago. Has anyone had a chance to port it to .NET 2.0 for MS Visual Studio 2005? The migration assistant in VS 2005 gives a ton of errors! Apparently the C++ CLI has changed in 2.0 much more than 1.1. Anyone port the code successfuly for .NET 2.0?
JonathanVQPAsked:
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_davidharrisConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Yeah, to answer the original question, I myself do not know of anyone that has ported the quake II .net port (grr) to .net 2.0. I've actually looked myself, I designed a mod for quake II where you fight other players with the robots from quake II, you have a certain amount of points and you use those points to build an army out of the bots already in the pak, (the tanks and the various soldier bots and the bosses if you can afford them). Which I had a great time making, because the quake II source was so easy to understand and modify. I made a couple of levels too and learned alot about that.

I actually ended up renting a quake II game server, but the server was a linux server and never figured out how to get a linux quake II dedicated server and windows game client to work together. I will say this though, I designed that quake II mod with visual studio, the 60 day trial version of visual studio .net, which compiled the original quake II source straight out of the box, which was nice. You might can compile that source with the visual c++ studio version compukens talking about.





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JonathanVQPAuthor Commented:
Well..I guess no one has done it. I am closing this.
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compukenCommented:
I don't think games should be done in the .net framework, I feel games should be done in C++ for speed, portabilty, and other reasons. I don't even know why it was ported to .net 1.1 in the first place. .net framework is good for programs that need to be scalable, run in multi-thread, multi-server. Games should be fast, clean machine code (not byte code like .net code), and with c++ you still can do anything you need (multi-thread).
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_davidharrisCommented:
I would answer this by saying that not all beginning game coders can afford Visual C++. Visual C++ .net express is free, as is Visual C# express, and for someone starting out it's great. You're right, but if you're broke and bored and a beginner, the express editions are good for that. Maybe that's why you see so many people starting out asking how to make games with .net.

What would you suggest for starting out with say DirectX for a beginner to use for a development environment?
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compukenCommented:
If you are going with Directx and are a beginner, I would say pick up visual C++ standard (around 100$) since Directx is very hard to setup on any other development environment.

Opengl setup is pretty much the same no matter what development environment you are using.

If you want a free good complier:
http://www.bloodshed.net/devcpp.html

a lot of independant/hobby programmers use it, as far as I can tell, it seems like Microsoft visual studio is the choice IDE for professional game/software developers. I am sure that there is at least one professional company not using them though.
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JonathanVQPAuthor Commented:
davidharris, thanks! I have MS Visual Studio 2005 Professional. I pretty much had to find out what the strange syntax errors are and just rewrite the code for .NET 2.0.
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_davidharrisCommented:
Hey I also remember some pages on making the q2 engine better. I couple of lines here and there would appartely greatly improve things. There's a way to add like 4 lines of code and that will give you higher res. textures, or let you use those textures. And some other simple things like fog and the like. I'll dig them up if you want them.
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