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www.mydomain.com resolves to my website internally and externally.  Mydomain.com resolves to my website externally but not internally.  How can I resolve mydomain.com to my internal website?

Posted on 2006-05-29
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Last Modified: 2006-11-18
From outside our network, www.mydomain.com resolves to my internal website.  From outside my network mydomain.com resolves to my website.  But internally on our network mydomain.com does not resolve to anything, let alone my website.  What DNS record am I missing?
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Question by:dakers2
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Expert Comment

by:r_naren22atyahoo
ID: 16787028
>>>From outside our network, www.mydomain.com resolves to my internal website.  From outside my network mydomain.com resolves to my website.
What exactly this means??

You mean, Your Internal and External DomainName are same i.e.
YOU AD Domain is also
Mydomain.com

and you external users are pointed to your wesite that is hosted internally on a webserver.
and your internal users are not pointed to the internal website when they type mydomain.com???
Is that rite???
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Expert Comment

by:gkumaran
ID: 16789055
The Host record of the Internal DNS Server (which the Local Machines refer to) do not have the Host record point to mydomain.com [or] www.mydomain.com.

Hence add the Host record to point to the Webserver (if you want) for mydomain.com or www.mydomain.com.
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Author Comment

by:dakers2
ID: 16789249
The internal machines can find the website by typing www.mydomain.com.  I have a dns record for www.  They just want to find the website by typing mydomain.com.  Without the WWW.  What dns record am I missing?  DNS will not accept just the domain name like "mydomain.com  webserver.mydomain.com"
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Expert Comment

by:carl_legere
ID: 16789362
you're missing a wildcard (*) record
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Expert Comment

by:feptias
ID: 16789899
The DNS record that would direct mydomain.com to your web server would be a Host (A) record in the fwd lookup zone for mydomain.com. If your internal web server has an IP address of 192.168.x.y then it would appear as follows when viewed from the DNS management console:

(same as parent folder)      Host (A)        192.168.x.y

However, the configuration of your AD domain and servers is relevant. As requested in another comment, you need to confirm in more detail what you have because the Host (A) record for mydomain.com would normally need to point to your domain controller. If your internal web server is not also your DC, then what you want may not be possible.
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Author Comment

by:dakers2
ID: 16791369
Yes the MYDOMAIN.COM is also the name of my AD domain.  So internally I cannot point MYDOMAIN.COM to resolve to my internal web server?  It does just fine externally.  It works both internally and externally just fine using www.mydomain.com.  Just my webmaster wants it to resolve by mydomain.com.
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Accepted Solution

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feptias earned 750 total points
ID: 16792706
I do not think that you should re-direct the Host record for mydomain.com on your internal DNS server if it is pointing to the domain controller now. Doing so might confuse AD, although I cannot say for sure on this matter. Furthermore, if you do change it, you might find that Windows changes it back again all by itself - things like that happen when the domain controller re-registers itself using DDNS (which is very likely how your DC is configured).

If mydomain.com and www.mydomain.com both resolve correctly externally, I would guess that this is because mydomain.com is hosted on a completely separate public DNS server. It is very common to have separate internal and external DNS servers - the internal one has records describing things on your LAN and for various reasons, including security, you would not want that information to be available on public DNS servers. The public one, usually owned and run by an external agency, would only have records describing how to reach your web sites, your e-mail servers, etc.

Many companies use a different name for the internal Windows domain (e.g. mydomain.local) and external Internet domain (e.g. mydomain.com). This is done to avoid the type of DNS conflict that you now have.
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