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Magicolor 2200 Color Laser on Ethernet

Tonight, I tried to setup a Magicolor 2200 on ethernet...could not make that sucker work.
IP - was set right (192.168.2.5) and I could ping it from the two other computers I wanted to connect to.
Auto router (gateway) was set right 192.168.2.1, sub net : 255.255.255.0 was right. I checked all these settings with the Router and the other two pcs.

Could not get it to pick it up on the network. I am using two Windows XP computers (SP2).

What might I be missing?
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jimmysupport
Asked:
jimmysupport
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1 Solution
 
Irwin SantosComputer Integration SpecialistCommented:
you need to create a TCP/IP port and NOT have your computer search for it via the network.

go to ADD printer.. you will be prompted to choose an available or OR create a custom TCP/IP port.. <<< choose that one.

put in 192.168.2.5.. when done, add your driver, either from the Windows list or driver in Have disk.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
Could you ping it?  Gateway shouldn't matter unless you have subnets.
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rindiCommented:
What OS's are you trying to print from? If a form of windows, then follow irwin's suggestions, If linux it may be more difficult, as these printers use the windows printing system and it can be difficult to get linux drivers.
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jimmysupportAuthor Commented:
irwinpks: That is how I installed it...I created a New TCPIP port..to no avail, when I print I get an error.

leew: I mentioned in my question that I could ping from both of the network computers.

rindi: I mentioned in my question I was using two Windows XP machines (both Pro with SP2, by the way).
so I am not trying to deal with Linux. In fact i downloaded a clean driver from the firm's web site.

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rindiCommented:
Sorry, missed that! When you configured the port on the PC's did you select the correct brand of the port, or select generic with port number 9100? Also, did you select the "Raw" protocol? What printing processor did you select?
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Irwin SantosComputer Integration SpecialistCommented:
who makes the printer?
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rindiCommented:
minolta-qms
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Irwin SantosComputer Integration SpecialistCommented:
have you applied page 42-43 of this manual?
ftp://ftp.minolta-qms.com/pub/cts/out_going/manuals/2200/2200in.pdf
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jimmysupportAuthor Commented:
Followed manual closely - re-did it several times. I will check whether we chose Raw, I did try changing spooling choices.
Chose Standard TC/IP Printing Port
Not sure what you mean by Printing Processor?
Thanks so much for the help.
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Irwin SantosComputer Integration SpecialistCommented:
for testing... can you connect the printer directly to one of your workstations....either by parallel port or usb?
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rindiCommented:
There should be an option in the advanced properties of the printer where you can choose different print processors.
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jimmysupportAuthor Commented:
That is what I did, I connected it to one of the xp units and shared it as a work around.
Works fine that way.
What is so puzzling is that I can easily ping it, yet it does not seem to receive the print jobs via ethernet.

I am tempted to try the Crown Printing Software...although the manual indicates it is not for XP.

The Oki's, Xerox, and HP color lasers connect so well. I would suspect the nic in the unit, but it was operating fine until the client's router died, and we changed the router, thus, the ip addresses...thus no printer.

I should have kept the old IP addresses I guess.
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Irwin SantosComputer Integration SpecialistCommented:
i'm thinking IP address conflct...

go to the server/router that is assigning DHCP IP address leases.... then view the scope...from there, pick a DIIFFERENT address that you have already assigned and one that does NOT fit the scope of the leased addresses
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atomicfire001Commented:
If it was an IP address conflict than pinging it would not produce a reply, or it would produce an erratic reply.

Check to see what type of printer sharing the print server does. Does it do RAW? SMB? FTP? HTTP? LPD? The lack of a common standard for network printing sometimes makes it frustrating. My IBM print server only takes jobs in RAW and if you print to it with SMB it will lock up. A LInksys print server I have only takes jobs in LPD, and if you query it with SMB it locks up.

Good luck!
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jimmysupportAuthor Commented:
Well - as for the address - there are only three allowed - I set it so the router would only allow .3, .4, and .5.
The printer is set for .5 (192.168.2.5) - it allows you to set the ip, infact, I think it requires you to enter the ip.
So, it is not a conflict.

The printer has a Machine Address - I think that is the same as a MAC address isn't it? Although I think it is actually a little longer than a MAC address.
If it is the same, what if I only allowed three MAC addresses on the network - think that would work?
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Irwin SantosComputer Integration SpecialistCommented:
@atomicfire001..."If it was an IP address conflict than pinging it would not produce a reply, or it would produce an erratic reply."

Not necessarily, it depends what networking gear is in place and how it handles the conflict.

@jimmysupport.."I set it so the router would only allow .3, .4, and .5."

give your IP address range more room....start the scope at least at .25-.253

See what happens..post your results.

------------------
plan x would be to RESET the printer, and configure your TCP/ip from scratch.
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jimmysupportAuthor Commented:
Plan x has already been done several times.

But - the ip has to be set on this printer. So what would be the reason to up the range?

I will try it - but sure would like to know the theory behind it.
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Irwin SantosComputer Integration SpecialistCommented:
you have 253 available IP's at your disposal...by moving the range up and giving it a wider scope, there' breathing room, even if the number of devices attach doesnt come close to the amount of potentially available IP's.

Also, some routers retain the leases and some do not, and then some don't free up the IP.  If the latter, then you run out of room real quick.

That's the method behind the madness.
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rindiCommented:
He's using a static IP, at least for the printer, so there dhcp and leases and ranges don't come into the picture, as long as he doesn't have the printer's ip served out by the dhcp server to workstations as well.
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Irwin SantosComputer Integration SpecialistCommented:
@rindi..yep..understood....and from experience..I ran into this problem before several years back and it drove me nutz..and by applying my recent comment...I was so relieved I could go home and eat dinner that day.  :|
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jimmysupportAuthor Commented:
I am going to try to go 'home for dinner' - will let you know what happens.
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Irwin SantosComputer Integration SpecialistCommented:
cool.
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Irwin SantosComputer Integration SpecialistCommented:
cool. thank yoU!
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