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Email addresses are getting changed on their own.

Something weird is going on with our exchange server (2003). last week i had one user's primary smtp email address change from what is should be to an old, temporary address from an old account of his.

Today, another user had some replys come back undeliverable because somehow his address changed from, "rjones@ourdomain.com" to "rjonesrobert@ourdomain.com". his full, first name was somehow appended as a suffix onto the actual email address. i've seen this type of distortion in the past usually with malware at work.

After that today, i decided to look at all of our user's exchange email addresses and found one other that was "goofy". There were duplicates with the domain name misspelled.

I'm trying not to panic about this but now I'm concerned that we've got a bug inside here. Do any of these symptoms look familiar to anyone? Or could this be something more benign, like a misconfiguration?
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dwielgosz
Asked:
dwielgosz
1 Solution
 
Irwin SantosComputer Integration SpecialistCommented:
go into the receipient policies and see if you have "old" items that you no longer need.  remove them
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dwielgoszAuthor Commented:
No, that's not it. The policy is minimal...and clean.
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rakeshmiglaniCommented:
check you recipient policies. try running a health check with the following MS tool

Microsoft Exchange Server Best Practices Analyzer Tool v2.6
http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?familyid=DBAB201F-4BEE-4943-AC22-E2DDBD258DF3&displaylang=en
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dwielgoszAuthor Commented:
OK, good idea. brb
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amaheshwariCommented:
This is related to Recipient Policy issue .There are some entry in recipient policy which is trying to change email address of users.

Check recipient Policy in ESM.
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BlevinsM3Commented:
In addition to the items listed above, remember that:
1. Anyone with enough permission can manually change people's primary and secondary SMTP addresses easily on individual accounts.
2. If someone right-clicks on the appropriate Recipient Update Service and chooses "REbuild" many SMTP addresses (especially primary ones) will change.
3. If this only is happening to a small number of users, check to make sure they don't have some strange issues with thier given names and surnames in Active Directory. If your recipient policies are set to do %g.%s, etc then that could be part of the issue.
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dwielgoszAuthor Commented:
where would they click on recipient update service to choose "rebuild" other than in ESM which I have the only access to.

as far as the active directory properties of the users effected is concerned, the one user that was having his first name suffixed after the actual string (to the left of the ampersand) had that in his account properties as an alias. How or when I have no answer?? example is his actual email is:

mjohnson@ourdomain.com
and his email was getting corrupted as:
mjohnsonmike@ourdomain.com

His alias was mjohnson; mike

How that got in there like that I haven't got the foggiest! So that's what was causing that truncated (or whatever you call it) email address.

Where do you find this: "If your recipient policies are set to do %g.%s, etc then that could be part of the issue."

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BlevinsM3Commented:
Ha! Good catch on the alias.

On your other questions:

1. In ESM is the only place to rebuild the RUS. So you've got that covered.
2. So far as the Recipient Policy settings, go into ESM/REcipients/Recipient Policies then open one of your recipient policies. Check the settings under Email Addresses. To give all your users an email address list Firstname.Lastname@domain.com you would put %g.%s@domain.com. The G is for Given Name, and the S is for surname. There's a good KB on this topic at
How to customize the SMTP e-mail address generators through recipient policies
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/285136

Hope this helps!
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dwielgoszAuthor Commented:
Do you suppose there's any way, through the Outlook client, that the user could have done something that would have written that alias in that format back to his profile?

The reason I ask, is because he would write his name like that, I never do. That is how the name pops into the "To" field in a new email when you have the auto-recall (or whatever it's called)working in the client.
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dwielgoszAuthor Commented:
yeah about the article, I have it here on my desktop, but you can only see the policy and cannot change it.
Under the general tab, "filter rules" I have (mailnickname=*) which is apparently the default policy and the remove and modify buttons are inactive.
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ExchgenCommented:
100% realted to a stale policy. This could either be recipient policy or any old mailbox manager policy.

Get in to ADSIEDIT and check under configuration -  and drill down to the recipient policies continer and check if you have any stale policies.

Also check if your organization in native mode, coz if there was any Exchange 5.5 server in past, the stale policy from 5.5 may be hanging around somewhere.

Create a new user and check if it is getting stamped with the right SMTP address.

Raghu
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BlevinsM3Commented:
Yup, thats because you'd have to add one other than the default. Just open the default recip policy and add a new one and you can change it.
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dwielgoszAuthor Commented:
are you saying to create a new policy and then delete the old?

There aren't any old policies. The first mail server we had here was exchange 2000. Had it for five years and migrated everything over into exchange 2003. yes, it is in native mode.
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BlevinsM3Commented:
You can't delete the Default Recipient Policy. I don't think that was your issue anyway, i think you found it with the Alias additions on those users.
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dwielgoszAuthor Commented:
Yup. I guess the question now is how did the alias of the two users change? The naming policy of (mailnickname=*) is OK, nothing wrong with that.
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dwielgoszAuthor Commented:
Answer #3 made me check the active directory user properties which is where I found the weird alias and thus solved the problem. Now I need to find out what caused the alias to change.
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