?
Solved

Connecting two Windows XP PCs for file transfer

Posted on 2006-06-04
22
Medium Priority
?
3,095 Views
Last Modified: 2012-08-13
I need to copy a large files from an XP PC to another XP PC.   How do you connect two PCs so that you can copy files directly?
0
Comment
Question by:JohnLucania
  • 9
  • 6
  • 3
  • +2
22 Comments
 
LVL 30

Assisted Solution

by:Irwin Santos
Irwin Santos earned 200 total points
ID: 16827195
you can do it several ways.

- network
- CD burn
- DVD burn
- External hardrive.

Network is more efficient.

you need a network card per machine...

with 2 machines you can connect directly with a crossover cable.

Else, you connect directly to a switch

In each case you create a workgroup and a sharename... Once done, you can copy & paste files between computers.
0
 
LVL 3

Assisted Solution

by:Jbirk1
Jbirk1 earned 1000 total points
ID: 16827989
Do it via a network.

Just connect a crossover between the two nics.

Now start run.  Then type ipconfig to find the ip address of each computer.

Type ping othercomputerip to make sure the packets are being transmitted and not dropped.

If it doesn't work or you get something like "request timed out," make sure to disable any firewall software including the Windows Firewall or Internet Connection Firewall.

Now the rulls are simple.  Each computer should have a different computer name and the same workgroup name.  The user account on each computer should be different than the workgroup and computer name.  I.e. if your username is irwinpks to login to the computer, the computername cannot be that.

You will need and probably already have "Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)," "Client for Microsoft Networks," and on at least the one sharing the files "File and Print Sharing for Microsoft Networks."  Chances are very good you have all these installed on both computers network adapter by default.  This is the minimum for a Microsoft Network file transfer.

If you cannot ping by ip, you may need to set a static IP.  Usually with 2000 or XP, APIPA will assign you an automatic IP.  If you need a static ip, go with something like 192.168.x.y/255.255.255.0 and 192.168.x.z/255.255.255.0 on the other.  x must be the same on both and y and z must be different numbers.  Essentially, the first three octets are defining the network and the last number is defining the computer or node number.

You can also use 172.16 or even 10 as these are all freely available private IP addresses.

10.*.*.*/255.0.0.0 and 10.*.*.*/255.0.0.0  for the other.  You can do anything you want after the 10 provided it is different and between 0 and 255.  10.0.0.0 and 10.255.255.255 are reserved for network and broadcast IPs though.

Justin
0
 
LVL 30

Expert Comment

by:Irwin Santos
ID: 16828546
Hi John....jbirk1....gave you the details that compliment my first comment.... should this be a revelation...locate SPLIT POINTS before accepting..

thanks in advance!!

Aloha from Hawaii,

Irwin
0
VIDEO: THE CONCERTO CLOUD FOR HEALTHCARE

Modern healthcare requires a modern cloud. View this brief video to understand how the Concerto Cloud for Healthcare can help your organization.

 
LVL 70

Accepted Solution

by:
Gary Case earned 800 total points
ID: 16829093
I don't think either of the above make this sound as easy as it is.   For example, you don't just connect a crossover cable -- one of the PC's must be set as a DHCP server unless you're using a router which serves this purpose.   Otherwise your PC's won't be assigned an IP address.  etc.   ... and you certainly don't want to be bothered with setting up static IP's, etc.  (not hard, but not necessary)

So ... (I'm assuming since you asked this question you're not overly familiar with networking) ... let's make it SIMPLE:

(1)  Connect the two computers ... you can use any of the following:

   (a)  A USB-USB bridge cable  (http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/searchtools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=1270851&Sku=C250-2072&SRCCODE=GOOPROD&CMP=OTC-FROOGLE)

   (b)  Connect each computer to a router (if they're both sharing the internet already, they may already both be connected to a router)

   (c)  A null-modem cable (http://www.cablesnmor.com/null-modem-cable.html)

   (d)  An ethernet crossover cable (as suggested above)  (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E16812117823)

(2)  Click Start - All Programs - Accessories - System Tools - Files and Settings Transfer Wizard

... If you can read and "click" you can do the rest with no further guidance :-)    When you get to the screen that asks if you want to transfers "Settings" or "Files Only" just select Files only.   The rest is just following the prompts.

If this is something you will be doing repetitively, then it is best to setup a small "Home Network" with the machines.   You can use either the USB bridge cable or one of the ethernet connections (b) or (d) to do this.   But it's still really simple ==> just click Start - My Network Places and then click on "Set Up a Home or Small Office Network" (listed under Network Tasks).   As above, it's then just a matter of following the prompts.
0
 
LVL 70

Expert Comment

by:Gary Case
ID: 16829125
... by the way, if both of the computers are already sharing the internet through a router, this really is a very simple task.   In that case, just use the "Set Up a Home or Small Office Network" wizard and you'll be sharing files in 5 minutes (or less) :-)
0
 
LVL 3

Assisted Solution

by:Jbirk1
Jbirk1 earned 1000 total points
ID: 16829569
Assuming everything goes right.

You are correct in that the router would most likely provide IP addresses via DHCP.

Assuming both computers have differnet names and the same workgroup as well as a default Widnows configured Network adapater, it should be a cake walk.

If it doesn't work, suspect programs such as NOrton Internet Security to possibly be blcoking filesharing.  The wizard is okay, but to be honest, I hate the wizard.  It makes me ill.  I would rather manually configure the network in about 2 minutes than s pend 5 minutes answering questions to Mr. Microsoft Wizard.

Justin
0
 
LVL 70

Expert Comment

by:Gary Case
ID: 16829890
I also do all my network configurations manually -- but for someone who's not proficient at doing so the wizard makes it very simple.   ... and if JohnLucania was proficient at networking he wouldn't have asked this question :-)      Best to tailor the answer to the level of the question as much as possible.
0
 
LVL 3

Expert Comment

by:Jbirk1
ID: 16830268
Yes, you make a good point.  Somehow, I am pretty sure John is going to figure it out.  He did contact Experts Exchange, afterall.

To boil it all down, I recomend getting a network switch such as a broadband wireless access point that has a 4 port switch in front.  IT would be good to have something that runs DHCP, so installation would just be easier.

Justin
0
 
LVL 70

Expert Comment

by:Gary Case
ID: 16830316
I'm sure you mean a router -- but let's be clear on the terms.  A switch (at least the simple intended-for-small-network ones) does not have a DHCP server onboard.
0
 
LVL 70

Expert Comment

by:Gary Case
ID: 16830326
...  Clearly the "best" configuration here is a router; two ethernet cables (to the PC's) and a simple home network setup.   ... but if this is a one-time transfer of a few files (it's not clear from the question, but certainly may be) there are simpler, quicker, and more cost effective ways (as detailed above).
0
 
LVL 23

Expert Comment

by:Danny Child
ID: 16832258
If this is just a one time copy - for instance, upgrading from one pc to another, I'd fit the old hard disk as a slave to the new pc, and then copy the files from there.  

Just need to take care with any jumper settings - let us know if you want more help with this particular solution.  
0
 
LVL 3

Expert Comment

by:Jbirk1
ID: 16838249
Hi Graycase,

To be clear on terms, I really do mean a switch.  I am thinking more along the lines of a fully managed switch running DHCP though.

My definition for a router is a Network Device that operates at Layer 3 of the OSI model and is capable of routing IP or IPX packets among multiple subnets and controlling incomming our outgoing traffic on various interfaces.

My Definition for Switch is network device operating at layer 2 of the OSI Model.  A switch is a smart hub that is capable of remembering MAC addresses to intelligently deliver packts on the same subnet.

There are switches that are capable of running DHCP without being a router.  There are also many Wireless Routers that are not true routers either.  Most are just cheap Wireless Access Points with a 4 port switch.

The device I encourage him to get is either a wired or wireless device or both.  It should be a switch in the sence it should operate at layer 2 of the OSI model, and provide DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) and NAT (Network Address Translation).  True, even the cheap wireless routers can often route somewhat between subnets and the Internet.

Sorry for any terms confusion.
0
 
LVL 70

Expert Comment

by:Gary Case
ID: 16838580
... my point is simply that devices sold as "switches" to the consumer market are not managed switches, and do NOT have embedded DHCP servers.   Remember you're responding to a question involving linking TWO PC's -- and a networking novice at that.   This guy is NOT going to buy a managed switch.   ... and if he did take your advice and order a "switch" from an on-line retailer;  or buy one at CompUSA, BestBuy, etc. it would be a $20 - $50 Netgear, Linksys, etc. => not a Cisco or other higher end managed switch.

I am, by the way, fairly familiar with the OSI layers => I was on a couple of the panels that developed the GOSIP standards back in the mid-80's (in, as they say, "another life") :-)
0
 

Author Comment

by:JohnLucania
ID: 16839041
Ok, I tried 'Files and Settings Transfer Wizard' since it seemed the easiest.
At the point for 'Auto Detect', it just hangs -- seems like it is searching but never ends.
Is there a way to get around it?
0
 
LVL 70

Expert Comment

by:Gary Case
ID: 16839303
How are the PC's connected together ??
0
 

Author Comment

by:JohnLucania
ID: 16839394
I put 'ethernet crossover cable'.
0
 
LVL 70

Expert Comment

by:Gary Case
ID: 16839404
Did the Wizard get to the point where it wrote a floppy for you to run in the other computer -- and did you run that floppy?
0
 
LVL 70

Expert Comment

by:Gary Case
ID: 16839410
... just read what you said again ("I put 'ethernet crossover cable') ==> Do you actually have an ethernet crossover cable connected to each of the PC's (one end at each PC) ??
0
 
LVL 3

Expert Comment

by:Jbirk1
ID: 16858207
Hi,

If you connect a crossover between the two PCs, APIPA should assign auto IP addresses that should work.

You should then be able to browse via UNC Path.
0
 

Author Comment

by:JohnLucania
ID: 16885527
I bought a 40 GB USB drive and copied the files over.  Obvisouly, I am not a network guy :-)
0
 
LVL 30

Expert Comment

by:Irwin Santos
ID: 16885947
cool.thankyou!
0
 
LVL 3

Expert Comment

by:Jbirk1
ID: 16925126
Whatever works for you is what you should do.  I am glad to hear you found a solution though an alternative one.

The good news though is that now you have a speedy external drive you can use for backup too.  Idealy, you should use either Microsoft Backup or just copy your important files to the device each time you change them on the PC.  I recomend you make a new folder for each backup then just start deleteing old folders when you run out of space.  This will leave you with different versions of the files you backup and prevent the backup becomming corrupted too.

I know an external drive by itself is not perfect considering experts recomend typically backing up to 2 different devices, but having one backup with various versions givs you a lot more leadway.

Essentially, you should backup often and your external drive is perfect in that you can store it separate from your computer(s).  In addition, the external drive is fater than any optical media or memory stick, and the external drive allows completely random file access meaning you don't have to erase it or go in round about ways such as DirectCD.  This device allows you to take the backup with you opposed to storeing your backup next to your computer.  For reasons such as fire, power surge, flood, or even theft.  I recomend you do what I do and backup everything each time you make a change and just toss it in y our car glovebox, backseat, trunk et cetera.  By Toss, I do not mean you literally throw it because hard drives are fragile, but I mean that you persistently backup each night and then put it in your car before going to bed.

If you do this, you will never run into a situation where you do not have your data or you have a data loss that you cannot recover from yourself.  You will not have to pay for expensive data recovery services, nor will you have to wait for the servics to be complted.  It is extremly unlikly you will have a surege,  fire, flood, or other natural disaster and also have the backup drive not work unless you throw it and damage the drive or your car gets stolen with the backup drive in it to.

This 40 GB external drive has the potential to save you thousands of dollars and major headaches, so please use it daily for backup.

Justin
0

Featured Post

[Webinar On Demand] Database Backup and Recovery

Does your company store data on premises, off site, in the cloud, or a combination of these? If you answered “yes”, you need a data backup recovery plan that fits each and every platform. Watch now as as Percona teaches us how to build agile data backup recovery plan.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

No matter the version of Windows you are using, you may have some problems with Windows Search running too slow or possibly not running at all. Before jumping into how you can solve this issue, just know there are many other viable alternative deskt…
I use more than 1 computer in my office for various reasons. Multiple keyboards and mice take up more than just extra space, they make working a little more complicated. Using one mouse and keyboard for all of my computers makes life easier. This co…
Finding and deleting duplicate (picture) files can be a time consuming task. My wife and I, our three kids and their families all share one dilemma: Managing our pictures. Between desktops, laptops, phones, tablets, and cameras; over the last decade…
Want to learn how to record your desktop screen without having to use an outside camera. Click on this video and learn how to use the cool google extension called "Screencastify"! Step 1: Open a new google tab Step 2: Go to the left hand upper corn…
Suggested Courses

621 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question