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Are there Video Capture cards that accepts a DVI input ?

Hello,

      Does anyone know of a Video Capture card that has a DVI input (other than composite and/or S-Video), good performance in recording and has a reasonable price.

     Thanks for any suggestion.

Lawrence
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experts_tkw
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experts_tkw
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1 Solution
 
Irwin SantosComputer Integration SpecialistCommented:
Never heard of DVI input... that is only related to monitors

Visit this site that has good products..
http://www.videoguys.com/vidcap.htm
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garycaseCommented:
"DVI input ... is only related to monitors ..." ==> WHAT !!  DVI is an interface specification for transmitting video.   It IS used for a lot of video card => monitor connections;  but there's NO reason it couldn't be used for any other video transmission requirements.   ... and of course it's used for a lot of video projectors;  HDTV inputs;  etc.   The HDMI standard is simply a "DVI +" interface => DVI plus audio

... on to the question:  If you're familiar with BOXX computers (high end video workstations), I found one reference to a game company that had a DVI capture capability built into a BOXX workstation (to capture the high resolution output of their games) => but it was a custom capture solution that cost upwards of $25,000.   I assume this does not meet your definition of a "... reasonable price."  :-)

There are some cards that will capture VGA (DSUB-15) video;  but none that I can find that will accept DVI inputs.   I suspect that's because of the HDCP signalling -- the DVI signal could not be recorded without decoding this.

... one problem I can think of ==> if you DID have a card that accepted DVI inputs, the BANDWIDTH requirements to capture a high-resolution DVI stream would be "interesting" to say the least.    ... and if you were going to MPEG compress it, it seems a VGA-quality signal would be just fine (and you can capture those).   Not beyond the capabilities of today's computers -- but you won't be capturing a lot of simultaneous inputs :-)

I think the best quality capturing you can currently achieve is to use component inputs -- and a DVI-to-component adapter (http://sewelldirect.com/dvivideoadapter.asp).  And the easiest way to do this is with a dedicated recorder -- here's one with component inputs and both a hard disk and DVD recording capability:  http://www.discountav.com/product.asp?product_id=RDRHX715   You could use it for the captures; and simply transfer the recordings via DVD to your PC for further editing.    An interesting side-effect is that the component signals will not carry the HDCP signal :-)

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Irwin SantosComputer Integration SpecialistCommented:
""DVI input ... is only related to monitors ..." ==> WHAT !!  DVI is an interface specification for transmitting video.   It IS used for a lot of video card => monitor connections;  but there's NO reason it couldn't be used for any other video transmission requirements.   ... and of course it's used for a lot of video projectors;  HDTV inputs;  etc.   The HDMI standard is simply a "DVI +" interface => DVI plus audio"

in the context of utilizing the DVI output for input on an image capture device
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experts_tkwAuthor Commented:
Hello Guys,

     Thanks for all your comments. I think that garycase's suggestion of a dedicated recorder can do a good job for digital recording. However, with irwinpks's capture card list, there are many card base systems that can be used for digital recording if we don't restrict on DVI input.

     As VGA quality seems enough in usual cases, could you suggest some models for digital recording to harddisk with a VGA input ?

     Thanks for your comments.

Regards
Lawrence
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Irwin SantosComputer Integration SpecialistCommented:
is there a reason for outputting via DVI and VGA?  were you looking to output from one computer to another?
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experts_tkwAuthor Commented:
Hello Guys,

     I know that there are ways to output the video signals from one computer to another, but through the composite video or S-video signals. I have applications that has to record clips for further referencing. VGA output signal would be a better choice for quality !

Lawrence

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Irwin SantosComputer Integration SpecialistCommented:
If the clips are already on your computer, then you need a non-linear video editing solution.. not necessary to have a capture card in place, just the right software to manipulate.

I use this several times a week to produce clips for our TV show.
http://www.adobe.com/products/premiere/

There are other high end products.. but Premiere is OK for what I need.

What did you eventually want to output too?  DVD? another clip?
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experts_tkwAuthor Commented:
Hello,

     That's fine

Lawrence
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garycaseCommented:
Lawrence,

Here's a portable recorder designed to capture high quality VGA inputs -- as with the solution I mentioned above, it's not quite in the "reasonably priced" category ($24,950), but it shows you're not the only person looking for such solutions :-)  
http://www.svconline.com/mag/avinstall_sonic_foundry_mediasite/

... back in the realm of "affordable" ==> here's a card that's available with either one or two VGA inputs that will capture at very high resolutions (up to 1600 x 1200): http://www.ems-digitalmedia.com/html/visionrgbpro.html

... or if you don't need to capture real-time video (i.e. just "grab" a few images), this simple framegrabber may be good enough:  http://www.pixelsmart.com/vga.html

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experts_tkwAuthor Commented:
Hello garycase,

     Thank you very much for your suggestions. That's enough for my application.

     Have a nice day.

Lawrence

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