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Issue with localtime function

I had written a perl script to use the localtime function to get the year, date, month, etc. I am a novice in perl so if there are better ways of doing this, bare with me. I'm working on a windows XP machine with Cygwin.

$date=(join'-',(split/ /,localtime)[1,2,4]);
$year = (join'-', (split/ /,localtime)[4]);
print "Date: $date\n";      # printed "Date: May-31-2006"
print "Year: $year\n";      # printed "Year: 2006"

This worked fine last week. But, today when I was runing the script it was not working. After a little debugging I had to change the above to below to get the same results:

$date=(join'-',(split/ /,localtime)[1,3,5]);
$year = (join'-', (split/ /,localtime)[5]);
print "Date: $date\n";      # printed "Date: Jun-5-2006"
print "Year: $year\n";      # printed "Year: 2006"

Why did this change? what am I missing?
0
nalinw1
Asked:
nalinw1
1 Solution
 
TintinCommented:
use POSIX 'strftime';
print strftime("%b-%d-%Y\n",localtime);
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alexsergeyevCommented:
you should read "perldoc -tf localtime" and "perldoc POSIX" to be sure that you will understand that in future
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ozoCommented:
(split' ',localtime)
may have been closer to what you intended originally.
But using localtime in list contex instead of scalar context as the others have suggested is a better way to do it.
And even if you use (split' ',localtime) it is not good practice to call localtime twice to get different parts of a date becase the date may change between calls, which could make your parts inconsistent.
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