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Moving Exchange location...

Another long winded one I’m afraid.

Our office is unfortunately closing, and we are being integrated into our parent company's office. We have Exchange 2000 running on our own domain and our parent company has Exchange 2003 on their domain.

We are all going to be physically located in the new 'parent' office, but will still need access to our old Exchange Server as it has a lot of public folder usage setup which the parent companies server doesn't.

Can I effectively install our Exchange 2000 server into the network up there and perform a trust between the two domains, then log on to the parent companies domain and still access out exchange server?

Or would it be better to remove the Exchange 2000 server from our own domain, and join it up to the parent companies domain (not even sure if this is possible or not????) would this procedure cock up its ability to receive email into our public folders?

I am really stumped as to what the best practice for performing this move could be?

It is the same example as if a company bought another company and then moved and integrated all its hardware into their own physical network. Has someone done this before and be able to offer some good advice?

We don't essentially need to continue sending mail from out Exchange 2000 server as we should all be using our new email addresses from the parent companies Exhcange 2003 server, but if it is still possible to send mail from two domains then that would be useful also.
 
Many thanks for any advice.


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Nicola_Bourne
Asked:
Nicola_Bourne
1 Solution
 
Redwulf__53Commented:
It all depends....
Really usefull answer isn't it?
Well, you basically have 2 options:
1) Migrate all users and resources (including mailboxes and Public Folders) into the Parent company's domain/forest. Advantages: your bosses will be happy that the companies are merging, and it will be less work to maintain. Disadvantage: a lot of work.
2) Establish a trust between the forests. Disadvantages: you have to maintain two separate networks, and cross-trust permissions have to be configured (AGLP) Advantage: quick to set up.


"Can I effectively install our Exchange 2000 server into the network up there and perform a trust between the two domains, then log on to the parent companies domain and still access out exchange server?"
Yes, as long as you keep the user accounts in the same forests. A user from forest A can not have a mailbox in forest B.
"Or would it be better to remove the Exchange 2000 server from our own domain, and join it up to the parent companies domain (not even sure if this is possible or not????) "
No, Not possible to join a 2000 Exchange server to a 2003 Exchange organization.

Hope this helps you decide.

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