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Using Serial Cable Conection in Windows XP to map drives

Posted on 2006-06-06
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Computer A is a Windows XP Professional on a work LAN of it's own that cannot be changed in any way. Computer B is a Windows XP Pro on it's own. I have set up a direct serial host/guest connection between the two which connects just fine.

However from here I do not want to map a drive so that a program on Computer A that periodically updates a file can do write it to the drive on Computer B. (Computer B is connected to the internet and can then send it up).

If I click "browse network places" I get an error saying network cannot be browsed, presumably because of security settings on Computer A, but who knows.

I would assume I could type RUN -> //computerb/shareddirectoryname and browse the filder, but I cannot even do that.

I have made computer b's group name the same as the group in computer a, even though they are not the same actual network group.

Am I missing something? Can this be done? If not is there a step-by-step guide to accomplish what I want some other way, which is to get a file from a non-internet LAN onto an internet-enabled LAN? I cannot use a file transfer program because the drive must be mapped so the program running on A can always write to it.

Thanks,
Bob
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Question by:kxojbob
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Expert Comment

by:Ron Malmstead
ID: 16842972
serial cable connection is sooooooo slow, that I would not recommend it at all.

Instead....

Why can't you put computer B on the same lan as computer A....just join the switches. Or, add a second nic card on computer A and attach it to the same network as computer B.

Even if they are different subnets, you can still add multiple subnets to the nic card on Computer A...and still make no changes to computer B.  

My Network places > Right click on the local area connection on computer A....goto properties.
Double click TCP/IP.  Change from Automatically obtain IP to an IP address that you specify...now Click Advanced.
Under IP Addresses, click add.  Now add an IP address under the same subnet as computer B.  Now computer A can communicate with both subnets....and you can get rid of your serial cable.



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Expert Comment

by:netmunky
ID: 16843080
is TCP/IP enabled on the serial connection?

also, is the built in firewall enabled on the connection?
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Author Comment

by:kxojbob
ID: 16843198
This sounds doable, but just to be clear on your instruction to "Change from Automatically obtain IP to an IP address that you specify" what i.p. address would I specify? How do I know what is not being used on the network elsewhere?

And when you are talking about right-clicking is this on nic card 1 or nic card 2, 2 being the new one connected to the WWW network?

Please spell it out for me :-)

Bob


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Expert Comment

by:netmunky
ID: 16843306
if you change from automatically obtain an ip address to a static ip address, you can use the current address that you have in your DHCP lease (run ipconfig from a cmd prompt)

make sure you change it back when you are done, or your DHCP lease will expire and you may get IP conflicts.

once you are on a static IP, you can add multiple IPs to one NIC card (advanced tcp/ip settings).

this can all be done with 1 network card in each computer, there is no need for any of them to have multiple network cards unless you are trying to run ICS to share internet connections.
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Author Comment

by:kxojbob
ID: 16843400
netmunky you totally lost me. How can you hook up two networks to one card?

I am tracking with XUSERX2000 and just need those things clarified.

Thanks to all

Bob
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Expert Comment

by:netmunky
ID: 16843468
open network connections
right click Local Area Connection, click properties
select TCP/IP, click properties
change to "use the following ip address"
enter information obtained from `ipconfig /all`
click advanced
click the top Add button under IP addresses
add your second IP/subnet

this will put 2 IP addresses on 1 network card. any halfway decent modern operating system supports this type of configuration (even OSX supports it)

for example, if your local area network resides on 192.168.100.0/255.255.255.0, you can add the ip/subnet 10.1.1.1/255.255.255.0 to the same adapter. then on the second computer (which i assume is a laptop from home?), you set the ip to 10.1.1.2/255.255.255.0, and it should be able to talk to the first desktop.
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Author Comment

by:kxojbob
ID: 16843743
Sorry man still not following. Even if I specify two i.p.s etc how would it physically be connected to the second network? The two routers are NOT connected and the two networks are completely separate, which is what started the question in the first place.
Are you aying the serial connection will make the connection to the second network?

Bob
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Expert Comment

by:netmunky
ID: 16843943
where are the two seperate routers? this is your first mention of using 2 physically different networks.

both computers would be plugged in to the work LAN, but only the work computer would have an IP associated with the work lan. the other computer (laptop, whatever) would be physically on that network, but the IP/subnet would be different, putting it on a different virtual network. as long as you are using a dumb hub or switch without VLANs, it will work just fine.

(this diagram looked so much better in a fixed width font)
   ETHERNET SWITCH
  -+---------------+---------------+-
   |                    |                   |
  COMPA           COMPB          LAPTOP
 192.168.0.1    192.168.0.2     10.1.1.1
                      10.1.1.2

COMPA and COMPB can communicate on 192.168.0.0/24, and COMPB and LAPTOP can communicate on 10.1.1.2
if network browsing doesn't work, you could always use \\10.1.1.2\sharename or \\10.1.1.1\sharename
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Author Comment

by:kxojbob
ID: 16844958
Very first sentence: "Computer A is a Windows XP Professional on a work LAN of it's own that cannot be changed in any way. Computer B is a Windows XP Pro on it's own" sorry it it was not clear that Computer B was on the WWW router.

So in the latest scenario you describe are the laptop and computer b connected by the serial cable? I just want to be sure sinc esome earlier posts suggested I use two nics.

I'll go try it once you confirm. Thanks!

Bob


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Author Comment

by:kxojbob
ID: 16844990
Also- I found that both the work LAN and the WWW lan are using default gateway 192.168.1.1 Is it a problem for both to be the same?

Bob

P.S. If this gets too difficult I can raise the point value.
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Expert Comment

by:netmunky
ID: 16845015
in my last postings, no serial connection is required

if you do use a serial connection, just make sure tcp/ip is installed on that connection using IPs that are not on the subnets of the work or www lan. access the computer directly via IP as mentioned above (\\10.1.1.1)
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Accepted Solution

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netmunky earned 1000 total points
ID: 16845032
sorry, firther explain:
in my last postings, no serial connection is required, i was assuming both PCs were plugged in to the same network switch. if this is not a viable option, you can use 2 network cards in each, but it ends up being just as much configuration as networking the 2 with serial.
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Author Comment

by:kxojbob
ID: 16845549
OK, well in that case I will go with the serial connection. It's only a small text file that has to go back and forth anyway.

So I will try what you suggest and let you know...

Bob
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Author Comment

by:kxojbob
ID: 16845886
It worked! Thanks so much for your help!
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