• Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 2763
  • Last Modified:

Email being delivered twice

Hi there,

I am supporting an environment of approximately 5 PCs who use Exchange Server 2003 for local email and calendar functions.  Each PC is configured with a user account and password and mailbox so that people can send and receive local email to one another and share calendar's etc.

On each PC, using Outlook 2003, there has also been configured an internal email address for each person provided by our ISP.  The reason that this is not hosted on the internal Exchange server is that the link tends to be a bit unreliable and we wanted to have all email sent to us from external parties to get to our ISP and sit there waiting for us to "pop" it down from them using the Outlook 2003 client rather than have it bounce if our email server was not available due to the link being down.

One of the staff members has a Blackberry device.  As we do not want to invest in a Blackberry Enterprise server, I plan to use the Blackberry Desktop Redirector to attach itself to the Outlook 2003 client for this staff member so that all emails that come in (he has three setup) get forwarded to him Blackberry device.  Another fly in the ointment however is the fact that this client uses a laptop, and as such his Outlook 2003 client that runs on this laptop is not always on and connected to the network and as a result mail sent to him does not forward to the Blackberry device when he takes his laptop with him.

To solve this, I installed second PC which remains in the office that does nothing but run WIndows XP Pro and Outlook 2003, and is configured with his email details.  I installed the Blackberry Desktop Redirector on this with the view that even if he took his laptop with him, this PC would always be on and would forward his messages to his Blackberry.

Both of these Outlook clients are configured to deliver mail to his mailbox on the Exchange 2003 server.

My problem, however, is that now when his laptop and C with the same Outlook 2003 profile are both running, both POP mail from the ISP and deliver it to the Exchange 2003 mailbox for this user.  The result?  Both PC and laptop now receive the message twice - one because the PC is popping it and secondly because the laptop is popping it.  

Is there a way I can prevent this so that the messages will overwrite each other if there are two the same instead of adding it to his Exchange mailbox on the server twice?

Thanks!  
0
peterkennedy
Asked:
peterkennedy
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
1 Solution
 
flyguybobCommented:
Regarding your question - unfortunately, not in this configuration.  That's not to say there is not more than one way to skin a rabbit.
I really love what the BlackBerry Enterprise Server can do.  However, the cost can be hard to swallow for small companies.

Questions:
Have you considered using a POP connector to connect to the ISP that is "mailbagging" your messages instead of having the clients POP it down and deliver it to their mailbox?
If you are running Windows 2003 Small Business Server, have you considered using the built-in POP3 connector?
  Sembee has posted some good information on POP3 connectors, but I can't find it....and there is good info on POP3 connectors on Experts-Exchange.

Have you considered the Windows Mobile features of Exchange 2003 SP2 and the new Windows Mobile devices, such as the Treo 700w?

Have you considered some of the hosted Exchange solutions using Exchange 2003 and Outlook 2003 Cached Exchange mode?  A few of them will also host a BlackBerry CAL (you still have to pay the $99 or whatever for the Client Access License)

0
 
SembeeCommented:
For your Blackberries, what you need is the Express Edition. It is free, comes with a CAL for one BB and additional BBS are something like US$25 each. Up to a maximum of 14. Works just like the big version, just without the bill.
Does need a dedicated machine, that is easily achieved, either using a desktop PC and a Windows 2003 license, or using a Virtual Machine (my favourite trick).

Bob - the only thing I say about POP3 connectors is that they are evil things. I don't deploy them at all. I have not found one reason to deploy the POP3 connector - I can get round any problem that the POP3 connector "fixes".

Simon.
0
 
flyguybobCommented:
Maybe that is why I couldn't find the information you had posted.  Sorry for the mistake.
I heard about the BES Express Edition a while back but could not find it on their website easily.  However, a quick web search returned the link:  http://www.blackberry.com/go/express
0
Problems using Powershell and Active Directory?

Managing Active Directory does not always have to be complicated.  If you are spending more time trying instead of doing, then it's time to look at something else. For nearly 20 years, AD admins around the world have used one tool for day-to-day AD management: Hyena. Discover why

 
peterkennedyAuthor Commented:
Thanks guys.  I have successfully downloaded the software and am planning its implementation.

Sembee - you mentioned it needs a dedicated PC.  Are you able to confirm:

1. Does it have to use Windows 2000 or 2003 server (I am assuming Windows XP will not be adequate)?
2. Does it have to run on a separate box to the actual Windows 2003/Exchange 2003 server?

It seems ideal for our needs... :)

Thanks!
0
 
peterkennedyAuthor Commented:
...and a further question...

Sembee, you mention using a Virtual Machine for this purpose.  If I have a powerful enough server, could I run Windows 2003 server as a VM on my Windows 2003/Exchange 2003 server perhaps?
0
 
SembeeCommented:
XP is not suitable. It has to be Windows 200x - preferably Windows 2003.
If the Exchange server has the spare resources, then a virtual machine on the Exchange server would be fine. it doesn't need much - 512mb RAM and a 20gb virtual disk will be fine. Make sure that you give it isn't own direct IP address, don't use the NAT options. The theory being that the server is useless without Exchange, so start Exchange then start the virtual machine. I have it working on two sites at the moment quite successfully - and tested it at home before I deployed.

I built the actual virtual machine on another system, and only once I was happy was it moved to the Exchange server. Most of the virtual machine applications require a reboot because of the network interfaces involved, so it was easily to build it elsewhere and then move it across once I can have the time to reboot the host machine.

Simon.
0

Featured Post

Upgrade your Question Security!

Your question, your audience. Choose who sees your identity—and your question—with question security.

  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now