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\\Servername is redirecting to the Inetpub\wwwroot directory

1.) The airhandler in our server room malfunctioned and the room became a sauna
2.) Out NAS blew the motherboard
3.) We pulled the drives and dropped them and the controller in another DC, and then created the share we needed
4.) We then redirected DNS for NASSERVER to TEMPSERVER

5.) Whenever we pull up \\NASSERVER we now get the TEMPSERVER's inetpub\wwwroot folder.

Any help here would be great
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napoleon41
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napoleon41
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2 Solutions
 
napoleon41Author Commented:
OK.  I stopped and restarted IIS and now the \\NASSERVER does not work at all.  I like that better!  How do I get the TEMPSERVER to advertise the share appropriately under an alternate name?
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
Windows systems can only have one name - you can't easily alias them - there was a freeware tool but I never got it to work correctly.  My advice would be to RENAME tempserver to nasserver.
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johnebtngCommented:
is \\the TEMPSERVER a NAS or some other Windows Server System?
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napoleon41Author Commented:
Ah.  Both the original server and the temp server are MS Servers.
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napoleon41Author Commented:
What about using the WINS service?

Also, you cannot rename a DC unless you demote it first!  No way as that would totally hose other processes.
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johnebtngCommented:
Right click on the my computer icon, and goto manage the system tools, Shared Folders, then Shares...

Does it show that the shared folder in question is there?
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napoleon41Author Commented:
-johnebtng
Yup, I know how to share.  lol.  \\tempserver brings all of the shares appropriately.  \\NASSERVER does not even though a ping to it is appropriately redirected.
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technologyworksCommented:
If they are both Windows servers, then just create an alias on your DNS server. Then, your workstations would be able to resolve both names.
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napoleon41Author Commented:
Yup.  That's what we thought, too.  But if you read that we already did that, you would know that it didn't work.

Which brings up the question of  . . . if \\unc is not actually resolving to an IP address, what service is it using?  NETBIOS?  

btw . . . \\192.168.0.19 (TEMPSEVER's address) work beautifully as well.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
Actually, you can, but you must be renaming a 2003 domain controller:
http://www.petri.co.il/windows_2003_domain_controller_rename.htm

Good luck with this - I've occasionally tried this with Windows systems and as far as I've seen, it cannot be reliably done.  In theory, DNS should work, but it doesn't in my experience for accessing shares.

www.optimumx.com (which appears down at the moment) is where I found the alias tool, here's a copy and paste of the google cache about the tool:

Network Alias v1.00 (NetAlias.exe)   Last Updated: 10/02/2003

Displays, adds or removes NetBIOS names for the Server service. This allows a computer to be accessed using an alias, or a name other than the computer name. The Server service will also announce this alias to the browse list where it will be displayed in apps such as My Network Places and the NET VIEW command. Use 'NetAlias /?' to view the syntax.

NOTE: The new name may not appear in the browse list immediately, it may take up to 48 minutes, depending on the complexity of your network. Likewise, names removed from the network are not immediately removed from the browse list, it may take up to 72 minutes. For more information, see Microsoft Knowledge Base articles 188001, 102878 and 150800.

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technologyworksCommented:
Ah, my bad.  That DNS bit slipped my mind after reading your first post.

Is it possible the name NASSERVER is cached on whatever machine youare browing from?  use NBTSTAT -c to check name cache.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
The DC bit slipped my mind after reading the question.
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napoleon41Author Commented:
Hey, no problem.  We are just under a bit of stress here.  ha!  

NBTSTAT -c shows the correct information.  Too bad there isn't a way to get to the heart of things and tweak that info.  Grrrrrr.  Makes me wish I had pushed through the debate about using Linux instead of MS.  

leew - I can't seem to find that file either, and their site is down.  Kind of a hard thing to search for as it hard to describe and rarely needed.
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livedrive777Commented:
The actual problem is that a server will only respond by its own hostname or its IP address.  If you want a server to respond by an alias name you have to disable strict name checking on its server service.  It will then respond by whatever alias you want to use in your DNS config.  Here is an article to check out: http://www.jsifaq.com/subQ/tip8000/rh8062.htm

You just turn on that reg key on the TEMPSERVER and reboot it, make sure the DNS alias is created, and maybe flush the DNS cache on the client side and then you should be good to go.  I use this constantly on Windows 2000 and Windows 2003 servers without issues all the time.
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napoleon41Author Commented:
That's a good comment, livedrive777, but a bit late.

As of 4:00pm yesterday, I put together several solutions and finally got it working.  I am giving points to leew as he reponded quickly, got to the heart of what my issue was, and at least got me on the right track some material to begin my search with.  

Actually, part of the solution (step 3) was actually already in the Experts-Exchange database, and though it worked for those people, I found the solution incomplete.  Here are the steps that solved my issue.

1.) Delete the original DNS entry and add a Host (A) entry for the alias (a CNAME might have worked, though.  Who knows).

2.) Add a registry key to the CurrentControlSet area of the registry using regedt32.exe.  I used a REG_MULTI_SZ (Multi-String Value which is not available in regedit.exe) and all of the names I wanted the server to use; I actually created several including a fake name as a control for testing.  Creating the fake name was how I determinded the necessity of #4 below.  

A REG_SZ can also be used if you only want 1 alias.  
Name the Value      HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\LanManServer\Parameters\OptionalNames
http://www.petri.co.il/forums/showthread.php?t=1580&goto=nextnewest

3.) Disable Strict Name Checking
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\LanmanServer\Parameters      [again]
Create a DWORD Value named DisableStrictNameChecking with a decimal value of 1
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;281308&;Product=win2000

4.) Remove the domain account for the server whos name is to be aliased.  Luckily the failed server was not a DC like I initially though.  Whew!  Until I removed the domain account in AD Users and Computers and replicated the change with AD Sites and Services, I could not access the server with the alias name (or I got the Inetpub\wwwroot listing . . . THAT was VERY strange).

5.) Reboot the clients if they cannot access the new alias name via \\alias\sharename.  I believe that an IPCONFIG /release . . renew would work as well, but YOU try getting someone to type that into the run command over the phone.  Ha!

Thanks for your help everyone!
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napoleon41Author Commented:
Correction.  #2 should read

"Add a registry VALUE"

Sorry for the confusion.  Be nice if you could edit your own posts.  
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