• Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 325
  • Last Modified:

W2k wireless unable to join Server 2003 Domain

I have a w2k Pro machine with a Dlink wireless pci card in it. I first joined my domain with this pc using an ethernet nic and was able to see all shares and was a full member of the domain. After removing the ethernet nic and using only the wireless card while logging onto the computer as the domain user I just setup I cannot join the domain. The login process works fine but I cannot see any shares or other computers on the domain. While the D Link wireless utility sees the wireless AP and joins it using my encryption key I cannot even ping the AP or the server or anything. PC works fine using ethernet card not fine using wireless card. WTF? No one better write back with "why not just use the ethernet card?"
0
Inx3us
Asked:
Inx3us
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • +1
1 Solution
 
Scotty_ciscoCommented:
are you changing the setup between the Ethernet and the wireless... IP address or are they assigned VIA DHCP?  You could have an ARP issue if you are changing things around a lot with a static IP address and not knowing if the requests should be sent to the wireless AP or a hardwired switchport

Thanks
scott
0
 
Inx3usAuthor Commented:
I've done it every way possible. The first attempt was to leave everything dynamic. This is how wireless laptops work in this environment and no problems. The wireless AP does nothing, it just takes the wireless connection and passes it on the the switch and server.
0
 
inverted_2000Commented:
Are you receiving any packets back on the wireless?  If not...then you are not correctly connected.

View the DHCP Client Log from another PC on the D-Link to see if it is logging you as a client.

If yes...I'd unplug the router and plug it back in (power cycle)

If no...I'd change the WEP key or WPA phrase...and make sure you have the 1st key selected to use in the D-Link.

Good Luck
0
What does it mean to be "Always On"?

Is your cloud always on? With an Always On cloud you won't have to worry about downtime for maintenance or software application code updates, ensuring that your bottom line isn't affected.

 
Scotty_ciscoCommented:
I am assuming there is a switch or device interconnecting the Server and the Wireless access point... a switch stores mac addresses and the server stores MAC to IP addresses in an arp table if for whatever reason the device in the middle thinks that the same MAC address is associated in 2 places one on the switch one on the AP then neither device knows where the node is at.  I would assume you have tried power cycling everything?

Thanks
Scott
0
 
Inx3usAuthor Commented:
Right now I am focused on the D Link card to AP part. I can see the wireless network and connect to it in the D Link utility by entering the WEP key  (sucess signaled by the Yellow D instead of the Red D). After doing this I cannot even ping the AP or open its utility by entering the IP address!?
0
 
technologyworksCommented:
I would not equate the yellow D with "success". Wireless connections have 2 phases - authentication and association. You can be authenticated to an access point with the wrong (or non-existent) WEP code (which will sometimes give you a yellow D), but still not be associated to the AP, which would prevent any network access.  I would test this 3 ways:
1. When configured for DHCP, are you getting assigned a valid IP address?
2. Assign your laptop a static IP the Dlink card. Now, try to ping the network (AP, router, whatever).
3. If possible, turn off WEP on the AP and try connecting with no security. This is the easiest way to tell if it is a "wireless" problem or a "network" problem.

Also, I'm assuming your AP has an IP in the same range as the rest of the network?  (don't laugh, i've seen this happen more than once).
0
 
Inx3usAuthor Commented:
Oh SNAP! I was using an old Encryption key! That little yellow D fooled me! Thanks for the new perspective.
0
 
technologyworksCommented:
:) Glad I could help. I know I fought that battle many times.
0

Featured Post

Nothing ever in the clear!

This technical paper will help you implement VMware’s VM encryption as well as implement Veeam encryption which together will achieve the nothing ever in the clear goal. If a bad guy steals VMs, backups or traffic they get nothing.

  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • +1
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now