Adding a switch to a full router

Several questions here

I noticed on linksys router an uplink port .  Is this for plugging in a switch ??  I was having a heck of a time expanding my router to manage like 12 total connections.

Is there any special need for an "auto sensing" switch.  I dont see that the one I bought says this feature.

What would happen if port one on a router was used to hook up an 8 port switch .  Can alll 8 new ports still work on the routers DHCP without getting confused ??

Seems like the more I worked on this, the worse it got.  For some odd reason , at one point I was getting a gateway assignment that was the IP of the server itself as opposed to the gateway of the router.  What would cause this ?

I need a review one more time on how to set DNS entries as primary on a client as the IP of ther server and then set the server for a forward look up zone that is the DNS # for the actual ISP ???  .... is it going to cause a problem on the clients to make a secondary entry that is an open DNS translator 12.127.17.71
bhamguy3131Asked:
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Lee W, MVPConnect With a Mentor Technology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
Answer my other questions first and I'll try to explain (though I have to leave for an hour or two).

To repeat:
Do you have a Windows Domain?  Active Directory?

DHCP is just a service - the router can provide it or the server can provide it.  If you use Active Directory, you need the server to provide it to make things easier.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
Do you have a Windows Domain?  Active Directory?

If so, your need to use DNS from the server ONLY and the server, for convenience and ease of management, should handle DHCP.

That said, you can add a switch to any network quite easily.  Switches/Routers that have uplink ports have the uplink port OR an additional port - so a 5 port switch with an uplink port has 4 ports + 1 UPLINK OR ADDITIONAL STANDARD PORT.

If the switch is autosensing, you don't have to worry - JUST ONE SWITCH needs to be autosensing.  Then it will connect the switch.  

If neither switch is autosensing and neither switch has an Uplink port, then you just use a crossover cable.
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bhamguy3131Author Commented:
i dont understand server based DHCP as opposed to the router
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bhamguy3131Author Commented:
i dont know how to answer

is there a domain ...
yes    server.domain.local

is there active directory ... i do not know what this means
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
Who runs the network?  I assumed it was you...

server.domain.local suggests you are using a domain and Active Directory.  What does the server run?  Windows 2000?  Windows 2003?  Windows Small Business Server 2003?  What?  Who setup the server?

I'm asking these questions because you asked:
> I need a review one more time on how to set DNS entries as primary
> on a client as the IP of ther server and then set the server for a forward
> look up zone that is the DNS # for the actual ISP ???  .... is it going to
> cause a problem on the clients to make a secondary entry that is an
> open DNS translator 12.127.17.71
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LANWorxCommented:
Hi bhamguy3131

It sounds like you have a small network with maybe 8 machines, and a router going out to the Internet. Is this right?

If so, putting a hub or switch of the inside interface will be fine so long as the number of IP addresses your DHCP server has to assign is big enough. My guess is that the Linksys router will be doing the DHCP for you. The DHCP scope (what information it give to the machine that asks for an address) will be an IP address for each machine, the default gateway (which should be the linksys router) and the DNS server (which will either be the router (if the router is proxying DNS .. which it probably is) or your ISP's DNS server (12.127.17.71).

For DNS, you should just give the clients an internal DNS server that will forward the requests to the ISP if that DNS server cant resolve the name. If you are relying on the secondary for external name resolution you will get very frustrated.

So, I think your network should be configured as:

Clients on a switch getting DHCP --- router providing internet, DNS and DHCP --- your ISP

Hope this helps
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