Patch cable connects laptop fine to router/switch, but not desktop?

I have just made a patch cable (5e) and am using it right now to connect to my router/switch on my laptop.  But when I try and use it on my desktop I get the "connected" icon, but there is no connection to my LAN or the internet. I restarted the desktop and powered down the cable modem and the router, but this doesn't seem to fix it.  I don't get the DHCP SErver, Default Gateway, DNS server info in the Status Dialog box, the desktop works fine with the router, via a wireless-G USB adapter, which I disabled, when trying to get the hard-wire to work. Any ideas?
davidgareauAsked:
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pseudocyberCommented:
Check the NIC configuration on the desktop - it should be Autonegotiate.
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pseudocyberCommented:
Is it a straight through cable?  Perhaps one device can do an auto crossover and one cannot.

Did you make a 568A or 568B cable - oranges on the left, or greens on the left?  Same on both ends, right?

What if you take another known good working cable and try it both on the laptop and desktop - does the other cable work?
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davidgareauAuthor Commented:
568-B, because the 568-A didn't work on the laptop and didn't even give the non-working connection that 568-B gives on the desktop. I have taken another one and it does the same thing.  That's why I think it's something configured on the desktop itself or the router (somehow blocking the hard-wired connection) but I don't know what it could be.
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masnrockCommented:
Try a different a cable that you did not make to connect the desktop and let us know what you notice.
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prashsaxCommented:
You should user cross cable to connect to passive devices.

Router and switches are active devices and can be connected to laptop using straight cable.

To connect laptop and desktop use cross cable and not cross over cable.

Cross cable would have 1,3 and 2,6 cross on each end.
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pseudocyberCommented:
Prashsax,

I'm confused by your statements.

Active vs. Passive - this has nothing to do with if a cross over is needed or not.  What determines a crossover is whether the two devices are DTE or DCE - Data Terminal Equipment and Data Communication Equipment.

If two devices are alike - both DCE - say a switch to a switch, a cross over is required so that the Transmit crosses to the Receive and vice versa.  Same appllies to two DTE devices.

If two devices are dissimilar, then a straight through is required.

Note - some equipment can create an electrical cross over inside the interface - either manually with a button or automatically.  It is, nevertheless a cross over interface - MDI/X.

"To connect laptop and desktop use cross cable and not cross over cable."  It would be normal to connect a PC to a network device - a switch or hub - which would be a DTE to DCE connection and would require a straight through cable, not a cross cable or cross over cable.
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prashsaxCommented:
I meant to connect a laptop and desktop with each other witout a hub/switch use cross cable.
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pseudocyberCommented:
Oh, I see.  Then I agree with you.  :)
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davidgareauAuthor Commented:
I don't want to connnect the laptop to the desktop.
I want to get the desktop to connect correctly to the router/switch, just like the laptop does correctly.
I have tried another wire and get the same results.
How can I find out if the desktop is set to Auto-Negotiate? in Windows XP
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prashsaxCommented:
Goto Network Connections.

Find the LAN card. Right click->Properties.
 COnfigure->Advanced.

Find a setting Speed and Duplex. It should be at Auto.
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ECNSSMTCommented:
just a shot in the dark, but ...

If you do an IPconfig /all and you still see info for the wireless NIC probably with something like IP Address: 0.0.0.0.  It is probable that your desktop is attempting to obtain and still access your network from the wireless USB.

Ensure that the USB is disabled under the network properties area.  

Regards,
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davidgareauAuthor Commented:
>>>>Goto Network Connections.
>>>>Find the LAN card. Right click->Properties.
>>>> COnfigure->Advanced.
>>>>Find a setting Speed and Duplex. It should be at Auto.

All I see is FIrewall setup and Network Wizard hyperlink

USB Adapter is disabled
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pseudocyberCommented:
From Control Panel->Network Connections.  You should see one which says "Local Area Connection".  If you don't, that would be a problem.
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prashsaxCommented:
On General Tab you should see configure button, right on top.

You need to Click it first, before clicking  the Advanced Tab.


The advanced Tab you are talking about(Firewall Config) is on main LAN Properties windows.



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scrathcyboyCommented:
Why not simply remove all the networking protocols on the desktop in windows networking, and reboot.  If XP, it is no big deal, it will install them all over again, and then you go through a config wizard, choose the 2nd one on the list, and choose residential gateway, then with cable connected, you should be seeing the network.  It only takes about 2 minutes, and it clears up failed TCP/IP.

Also make sure the straightthrough cable is to industry specs.  
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davidgareauAuthor Commented:
The problem was in the TCP/IP settings.
It was set to a static IP for the NIC, I had the Wireless-G USB Adapter set to Dynamic (Automatically Obtain) and I didn't realize that each one was independent of the other.  So, I got the connnection icons, but no transmission because the IPs were messed up.

thanks
david
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