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Steps for migrating from Windows NT to AD child domain

Posted on 2006-06-10
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Last Modified: 2010-08-05
Hi Experts,
I have 2 NT domains at different places (say NTDOM-A at Site1 and NTDOM-B at Site2). I want to migrate them to Windows 2003 R2. I will build AD Forest Domain with 2 DC's (say WinRoot.local at Site1) and will create 2 child domain with 2 DC's in each domain (child1.WinRoot.local at Site1 & child2.WinRoot.local at Site2). I want to install Exchange cluster as Back-End with a front-end at both the child domains.

Q1)I would like to know how should I proceed with the DNS server placement, DNS Zone settings, Zone Replication & Forwarders?
Q2) Do I need to migrate the DNS zones from old DNS server to new DNS servers?
Q3)After migrating comptuer objects using ADMT 3.0, what will be the impact on the client side? Do I need to visit each client to copy the NT profile to new 2003 domain profile?
Q4) If I use ADMT 3.0, is the procedure for migrating passwords same as ADMT 2.0?
Q5) If I opt for inplace upgrade instead of migration, will the client machines recognize the new domain automatically and all the users will still have the same desktop settings? In migration ADMT will send an agent to the workstations, with an inplace upgrade of PDC, how will the workstations know about the new AD domain?



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Question by:exp_ee
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Mike Kline earned 500 total points
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First thing I would ask is why create two domains.  Is it possible to consolidate the NT domains into one 2003 domain.  

Q1)  Are currently using an ISP DNS server or your own for access to the internet.  What I would do is use a split DNS design.  Have your internal DNS servers forward out to your ISP.  Use active directory integrated zones in your forest.

Q2)  If you are going to build a new forest the machines should all re-register in DNS.  What is your current DNS setup?

ADMT 3.0 will migrate the profiles and the passwords.  

A good place to start reading (you may have seen this already) is here

http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2003/evaluation/whyupgrade/nt4/nt4domtoad.mspx
Migrating Windows NT Server 4.0 Domains to Windows Server 2003 Active Directory

Have you thought about how you are going to migrate your exchange servers and mailboxes?
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by:exp_ee
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To have 2 child domains is the management decision as each domain will be representing a different business unit.

Exchange will be a new implementation in Windows 2003, present messaging system is on Oracle Collaboration Services. Is there a way to migrate mailboxes from OCS to Exchange, I am planning to instruct all the users to move all the mails to pst from the outlook and once exchange is setup, they can move mails from pst to mailbox.

I am planning to let the DCPROMO install the DNS services on Forest domain and as well as on both the child domains. I will delegate the child domain before running DCPROMO on the child domain. Can you please clarify me, do I have to create secondary zone of forest in the child DNZ or secondary zone of child domain in the forest DNS?

Can you hint me on the Q5.
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by:Mike Kline
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No you don't need to create a secondary zone for your child domains.  Windows 2003 DNS lets you replicate the forest AD integrated zones or you can use stub zones.   I'd just let all the zones replicate in your case.

http://www.windowsnetworking.com/articles_tutorials/DNS_Stub_Zones.html
Stub Zones

You will have to migrate the computers using ADMT.  That is how they will know about the new domain because you will migrate them over.  Make sure to change your DHCP scopes to point to the new DNS servers.

ADMT should migrate the profiles but test that.  I've used Quest and NETIQ for migration but never AMDT but it is a decent tool.

Thanks
Mike
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by:exp_ee
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If I upgrade the NT domain to AD Child domain, how can I use ADMT to migrate computers, as after upgrade there is no NT Domain. And from NT to AD only interforest migration is possible.
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by:Mike Kline
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If you do an in-place upgrade from NT to 2003 then your domain will stay the same because you are just upgrading.  Your machines will be fine in that scenario.

If you want to create a new domain then that is where ADMT comes into play.

Thanks
Mike
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by:exp_ee
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Thanks Mike for your suggestions. I will plan the migration and start in a week or so.
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