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Print to a serial printer and rdp.

Posted on 2006-06-11
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Last Modified: 2012-06-27
Hi

I have some problem to print to a serial ticketprinter. The ticketprinter and a laptop with XP home is located at one office and at the mainoffice there is a XP Pro workstation. We conncet to the XP Pro Workstation through VPN and with Remote Desktop Connection and are using a telnet application which needs to print tickets to the printer connected to the XP home laptop. How can we do this?

Regards
Mattias
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Question by:BraData295
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Mohammed Hamada earned 500 total points
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by:Merete
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This laptop with XP home , Remote Desktop is not available in Windows XP Home Edition .
XP Home doesn't let users connect to a domain. You will have to install remote desktop.

The machine you want to connect >to <must have either terminal services or remote desktop sharing installed and running.
The machine you want to connect >from <must have the Terminal Services or Remote Desktop client installed. The Remote Desktop client is included in Windows XP, The Remote Desktop Connection software is pre-installed with Windows XP. To run it, click Start, click All Programs, click Accessories, click Communications, and then click Remote Desktop Connection. This software package can also be found on the Windows XP Professional and Windows XP Home Edition product CDs and can be installed on any supported Windows platform. To install from the CD, insert the disc into the target machine's CD-ROM drive, select Perform Additional Tasks, and then click Install Remote Desktop Connection.

It can be used to connect to both Terminal Services and Remote Desktop.
When you run Remote Desktop Client, you'll specify the name of the machine to connect to and possibly some options controlling the connection. As long as you can "see" the other machine - meaning it's on your local LAN, or behind some kind of firewall on the internet, the client then connects and you'll be presented with the very familiar logon screen from that machine. Logon, and you're there.

Once connected you can do anything remotely that you could if you were sitting at the machine, with two very important exceptions:

If the machine is truly physically remote from you, you'll not be able to do things like insert a CD-ROM, or other physical things.
Windows must be running, which implies that you cannot remote-desktop to the boot sequence or to change BIOS settings.
As I mentioned earlier, you can happily use remote desktop across the internet, as long as the server is not protected by a firewall such as a broadband router. If it is, and your firewall or router supports it, you can open port 3389 on the firewall and forward that to the machine you want to connect to. Note that if there is more than one machine behind the firewall, only one can be connected to across the firewall this way.

And finally, Microsoft has a "how to" article on setting up and using Remote Desktop on Windows XP here.
Get started using Remote Desktop with Windows XP Professional
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/mobility/getstarted/remoteintro.mspx


FYI
Networking Differences Between XP Pro and XP Home

XP Pro systems can join a domain; XP Home systems can't, which limits its use to home and SOHO environments because it can't use any corporate-specific features such as IntelliMirror.


Microsoft Internet Information Services (IIS) 5.1 and Personal Web Server (PWS) are found only in XP Pro.


Direct access to the Administrator account is available only in XP Pro. XP Home users must log on using Safe mode to access the Administrator account.


XP Pro supports Remote Desktop, which is basically a single-user version of Windows 2000 Server Terminal Services. XP Home supports only Remote Assistance.


Networking-related Group Policy Objects (GPO) are available only in XP Pro. XP Home supports no group policies.


Microsoft Remote Installation Services (RIS) and Sysprep are supported only in XP Pro.


The Network Monitor application is available only in XP Pro.


The UI for IP Security (IPSec) is available only in XP Pro.


SNMP support, Simple TCP/IP Services, the service access point (SAP) and Client Services for NetWare (CSNW) are available only in XP Pro.


XP Home supports only simple file sharing. Detailed file-level security permissions such as those found in Win2K are available only in XP Pro, which also supports the simple file-sharing model that XP Home uses.


XP Pro lets users limit the number of connections to shared folders and control user access by account. XP Home users access shared folders through the Guest account, which is disabled by default in XP Pro.12. You can upgrade Windows NT 4.0 Workstation and Win2K Professional only to XP Pro. You can upgrade Windows 9x versions since Windows 98 only to XP Home. Neither version supports upgrades from Windows 95.
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