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SCO Openserver wont allow Telnet from public IP's?

Posted on 2006-06-12
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Last Modified: 2013-12-27
Guys,
Ive got a SCO openserver (3.2) that will allow access by telnet to anyone on the LAN but when I forward in telnet (temporary) from the firewall it rejects the connection attempts.  From the client it just times out. I presume the previous admin had this blocked for good reason, however we need to change it temporarily.  any help would be greatly appreciated. I am much more a windows admin then unix.
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Question by:Poudrecomputer
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by:dotENG
ID: 17040478
This is the OS/2 channel, you should post your question in:
http://www.experts-exchange.com/Operating_Systems/Unix/

Anyway, this looks like a firewall/routing/netmask problem.
Try running "netstat –rn" to get your network configuration.
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Author Comment

by:Poudrecomputer
ID: 17043700
dotENG,
Yah i noticed i somehow posted to the wrong spot.. anyways... heres the results from hyperterm
---------------------------------------
netstat -rn
Routing tables
Destination           Gateway             Flags    Refs        Use      Interface
127.0.0.1             127.0.0.1             UH          3      262382        lo0
192.168               192.168.0.100      UC          1        0              net0
192.168.0.100      127.0.0.1            UGHS      163      833           lo0
224                     192.168.0.100      UCS         0        0              net0
root#
---------------------------------------

I appreciate any help! : )
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Accepted Solution

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dotENG earned 500 total points
ID: 17046114
Most likely your netmask is incorrect, to be sure do a "cat /etc/tcp" and check for something that looks like NETMASK=255.255.0.0
If so, edit the /etc/tcp file to NETMASK=255.255.255.0 and add GATEWAY=IP_ADDRESS_OF_FIREWALL.

All this is correct if your network uses Class C netmask (254 addresses from 192.168.0.1 to 192.168.0.254), if your network uses Class B netmask (65534 addresses from 192.168.0.1 to 192.168.255.254) then don't change the mask.

I don't know if it's possible to restart networking in SCO like Linux (/etc/init.d/network restart), so if it's possible, restart the server.
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