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ADP - VBA Functions vs SQL UDFs

Posted on 2006-06-13
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Hi,

I've moved most of my databases now to ADP as the performance with the SQL backend is superb, though one of my dBs has a large number of VBA functions programmed within it.  These VBA functions were used within update queries within the db when it was a mdb, and I'll need to use them in the same context within the ADP.  Anyone able to help out on the below questions on this or provide any useful tips?

- Can VBA functions be accessed from a SQL Server Query/SP?
- Are there any performance benefits from converting them into SQL UDFs?
- As the VBA functions are fairly large and complex, is it fairly easy to convert them into T-SQL based UDF?

Thanks for any help or guidance,

Simon
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Question by:simon_kirk
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Leigh Purvis earned 500 total points
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1) No - SQL Server is not VBA aware
2) Yes - in that they won't work otherwise.  But sometimes there's benefit to be had in taking some load off the server and onto the client. (In mdb files).
3) Not particularly.  Depends on what they do.  VBA is a programming language.  Not as rich as some - but leagues ahead of T-SQL for maniuplation, which as a data set language, simply isn't designed to do that.

If you want to give some more details - we can try to also ;-)
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by:Leigh Purvis
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You might have more luck in SQL 2005 - and writing .NET equivalents?
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