Solved

XP Pro SP2 Access Denied to Disk Management

Posted on 2006-06-13
7
459 Views
Last Modified: 2013-12-03
I just purchased a new Dell computer, and when I try to go into Disk Management, i get the error.

You do not have rights to logial disk manager.  

I am logged in as the Administrator account and even went and added all group permissions to the Administrator account.  

Any ideas?

Patrick
0
Comment
Question by:truth_talker
7 Comments
 
LVL 39

Expert Comment

by:PUNKY
ID: 16898451
0
 
LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:DCreature
ID: 16899735
PUNKY, what does that has to do with his problem???

Anyway, truth_talker, were you trying to get into Disk Management which is part of Computer Management? When you said Logical Disk Manager, this reminds me of these two services (To see these two services, type services.msc in Run dialog box):

* Logical Disk Manager - Automatic (Startup Type)
* Logical Disk Manager Administrative Service - Manual (Startup Type)

Right click it and select Properties, under the first tab, make sure your Startup Type is set to be the same with the ones above. Then under Log On tab, mine has "Local System account" selected under 'Log on as' for both services.

Maybe the account used to log on and use these services, don't have permission to use them.
0
 
LVL 39

Expert Comment

by:PUNKY
ID: 16899861
Oop! I misunderstood his question :) Thank for correct me DCreature!
0
Is Your Active Directory as Secure as You Think?

More than 75% of all records are compromised because of the loss or theft of a privileged credential. Experts have been exploring Active Directory infrastructure to identify key threats and establish best practices for keeping data safe. Attend this month’s webinar to learn more.

 
LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:DCreature
ID: 16900011
PUNKY, no problems.

Truth_Talker, I have another suggestion, try creating another user account, name it "TestAdmin", as a member of Administrators group, then logon to Windows with TestAdmin account, try to access Disk Management.

If you can access it then the other account probably doesn't have privileges to use a few things, maybe it was set as a Power User account, just because the username is Administrator, it doesn't mean those Dell guys setup this account as a member of Administrators group for you.

The default membership of Administrator account is "Administrators" and "Users" group, check that this matches yours, if it's a member of other groups, try removing it from those groups and leave it as a member of "Administrators" and "Users" group only, and try again.
0
 
LVL 6

Accepted Solution

by:
Booda2us earned 500 total points
ID: 16900186
As the Microsoft article "Access to Disk Manager is Denied" (http://support.microsoft.com/default/aspx?scid=kb;en-us;q264910) explains, this problem usually occurs when the default authentication level or the default access permissions setting in the Distributed COM Configuration (dcom-cnfg.exe) utility has been changed from Connect to Default. To resolve the problem, run dcomcnfg.exe; this action opens the Distributed COM Configuration Properties dialog box. Go to the Default Properties tab and change the Default Authentication Level to Connect. Go to the Default Security tab and click Edit Default, under Default Access Permissions. Click Add, select the Administrator account or Administrators local group, and set the access type to Allow Access. Click OK repeatedly to exit the utility, then shut down and restart the system. . . .
Hope this helps, Booda2us
0
 
LVL 15

Expert Comment

by:bpmurray
ID: 16902746
I had this recentlly, and the reason was that there was no Administrator account explicitly set up on the new machine -it simply accepted Administrator as a login. I imagine this actually matches Booda2us comment that this had to do with accepting default security. Just check in your local users that you have a user called "Administrator" and that user is a member of the group "Administrators".
0
 

Author Comment

by:truth_talker
ID: 16902872
The solution from Booda2us worked.

Thanks
0

Featured Post

Is Your Active Directory as Secure as You Think?

More than 75% of all records are compromised because of the loss or theft of a privileged credential. Experts have been exploring Active Directory infrastructure to identify key threats and establish best practices for keeping data safe. Attend this month’s webinar to learn more.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Introduction Often we come across situations wherein our batch files would be needing to reboot Windows for a variety of reasons. A few of them would be like: (1) Setup files have been updated whose changes can take effect only after a reboot …
Many people tend to confuse the function of a virus with the one of adware, this misunderstanding of the basic of what each software is and how it operates causes users and organizations to take the wrong security measures that would protect them ag…
Excel styles will make formatting consistent and let you apply and change formatting faster. In this tutorial, you'll learn how to use Excel's built-in styles, how to modify styles, and how to create your own. You'll also learn how to use your custo…
Need to grow your business through quality cloud solutions? With everything required to build a cloud platform and solution, you may feel like the distance between you and the cloud is quite long. Help is here. Spend some time learning about the Con…

911 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question

Need Help in Real-Time?

Connect with top rated Experts

23 Experts available now in Live!

Get 1:1 Help Now