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Cascading 4 Linksys wireless routers

Posted on 2006-06-13
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Last Modified: 2013-11-29
I have a network; 4 routers (2 Linksys wrt54g and 2 Linksys wrt55ag) connected to a 3 com switch and switch is connected to satellite modem (DHCP). I have found that using a switch is giving problems and I want to cascade the 4 routers; 1st wrt54G connected to the satellite modem and 2nd, 3rd and 4th (1 wrt54g and 2 wrt55ag) connected to the first router. Please advise what will be the settings (router IP, DHCP starting IP and Ending IP , etc) on 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th router. Detailed instructions please.
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Question by:shahidsa
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v_karthik earned 250 total points
ID: 16900606
So we have a network like this -

Routers A, B, C and D. Switch S. Modem M   (I hope my figure below won't get misaligned after I submit this post)

              C
              |
M -- S -- A -- B
             |
             D

The router A's WAN side should be connected to S. It runs DHCP to get its IP address from M.   You should connect the WAN ports of B, C, D  to A's LAN ports.  Use DHCP on those to request A for IP addresses.

Since you are using DHCP throughout, you won't need to allocate an IP address manually. Just make sure that, you don't use the same subnet on 2 interfaces. For eg, if M gives out an address like 192.168.1.2 / 255.255.255.0 to A,  use a different subnet on A's other ports. You could make it allocate DHCP addresses from the networks 10.1.1.0, 10.1.2.0 or something like that. Again, the LAN side ports on B, C, D should not be allocating addresses to their clients in the same subnet as the connection to A.
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by:shahidsa
ID: 16900920
Karthik, your figuure is perfect, but I dont want to use the Switch. If I will not assign the IP to B, C & D then the router IP will stay 192.168.1.1 for all the four (I havent tried, its a general thinking).

How about if I assign like this, A=192.168.1.1, B=192.168.1.2, C=192.168.1.3 & D=192.168.1.4. And disable DHCP (LAN) on B,C & D (all the computers will get IP from A. Is it possible to do in this way.

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by:pseudocyber
pseudocyber earned 250 total points
ID: 16901736
>>How about if I assign like this, A=192.168.1.1, B=192.168.1.2, C=192.168.1.3 & D=192.168.1.4. And disable DHCP (LAN) on B,C & D (all the computers will get IP from A. Is it possible to do in this way.

That should work fine.

However, connect BCD to each other's LAN ports - you might need crossover cables to do this - depending on whether the device can crossover on its own or not (auto MDI/X or "Autodetect").  Don't use the WAN port on BCD.

Disable DHCP on BCD.

Assign a unique IP to BCD - for instance, 192.168.1.5, .6, .7.

Change the username (if you can) and password on BCD to match A.

I will assume you have a reason for wanting to chain them - because unless there's special circumstances, this isn't a very good design because of choking the traffic the further you go and a failure along the chain takes everyone out downstream from the failure.

Hope this helps.
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by:v_karthik
ID: 16902827
Err .. im not too sure if this'll work ... reason is as follows:

I was going to tell u myself to remove the switch since it doesnt seem to be required anymore. IP address is not going to be affected because of this since switch is a layer 2 device. Which means, if ur modem is configured to send dhcp address, u have to make A take it. And btw, if the modem is supposed to be a gateway to the Internet, you'll not be getting an address like 192.168.*.* since thats a private ip (used only inside a private network, not valid on the Internet). This is one thing.

Now, as per ur thoughts, if we put A to be say 192.168.1.1 (again, just for now, bcoz this is a private ip). The WAN side of A is on the network 192.168.1.0 / 255.255.255.0. Now if u assign the address 192.168.1.2 to B, this becomes part of the same subnet. To my knowledge, you need to make the WAN and LAN different subnets. So that means, you assign a different range of addresses to B C D, like 192.168.2.2, 192.168.2.3, 192.168.2.4.

Again, on the OTHER side of B, C and D (other side is the one not connected to A, the LAN side), you need to give out addresses that is NOT on the same subnet as the connection between B and A, C and A, D and A. For example, u could start from 10.1.1.2 for B's clients. Note that, the LAN side of B will have an address 10.1.1.1. Similarly, in the above paragraph, you should've made 192.168.2.1 as the LAN side address of A itself.

I'm trying to think aloud now... what happens if we do assign addresses like the way you wanted. A packet comes from the outside destined to 192.168.1.2, which is B in your case. But it has to come thru M-> A connection. Now to A, the subnet 192.168.1.0/255.255.255.0 is the connection between A and M, and NOT A and B. So I think it'll just assume the client is not present and drop the packet (?). May be I'm thinking a bit too much, but if ur configuration doesn't work for u, think along these lines, and try whatever I said.

Hope it makes sense.
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