• Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 567
  • Last Modified:

Cascading 4 Linksys wireless routers

I have a network; 4 routers (2 Linksys wrt54g and 2 Linksys wrt55ag) connected to a 3 com switch and switch is connected to satellite modem (DHCP). I have found that using a switch is giving problems and I want to cascade the 4 routers; 1st wrt54G connected to the satellite modem and 2nd, 3rd and 4th (1 wrt54g and 2 wrt55ag) connected to the first router. Please advise what will be the settings (router IP, DHCP starting IP and Ending IP , etc) on 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th router. Detailed instructions please.
  • 2
2 Solutions
So we have a network like this -

Routers A, B, C and D. Switch S. Modem M   (I hope my figure below won't get misaligned after I submit this post)

M -- S -- A -- B

The router A's WAN side should be connected to S. It runs DHCP to get its IP address from M.   You should connect the WAN ports of B, C, D  to A's LAN ports.  Use DHCP on those to request A for IP addresses.

Since you are using DHCP throughout, you won't need to allocate an IP address manually. Just make sure that, you don't use the same subnet on 2 interfaces. For eg, if M gives out an address like / to A,  use a different subnet on A's other ports. You could make it allocate DHCP addresses from the networks, or something like that. Again, the LAN side ports on B, C, D should not be allocating addresses to their clients in the same subnet as the connection to A.
shahidsaAuthor Commented:
Karthik, your figuure is perfect, but I dont want to use the Switch. If I will not assign the IP to B, C & D then the router IP will stay for all the four (I havent tried, its a general thinking).

How about if I assign like this, A=, B=, C= & D= And disable DHCP (LAN) on B,C & D (all the computers will get IP from A. Is it possible to do in this way.

>>How about if I assign like this, A=, B=, C= & D= And disable DHCP (LAN) on B,C & D (all the computers will get IP from A. Is it possible to do in this way.

That should work fine.

However, connect BCD to each other's LAN ports - you might need crossover cables to do this - depending on whether the device can crossover on its own or not (auto MDI/X or "Autodetect").  Don't use the WAN port on BCD.

Disable DHCP on BCD.

Assign a unique IP to BCD - for instance,, .6, .7.

Change the username (if you can) and password on BCD to match A.

I will assume you have a reason for wanting to chain them - because unless there's special circumstances, this isn't a very good design because of choking the traffic the further you go and a failure along the chain takes everyone out downstream from the failure.

Hope this helps.
Err .. im not too sure if this'll work ... reason is as follows:

I was going to tell u myself to remove the switch since it doesnt seem to be required anymore. IP address is not going to be affected because of this since switch is a layer 2 device. Which means, if ur modem is configured to send dhcp address, u have to make A take it. And btw, if the modem is supposed to be a gateway to the Internet, you'll not be getting an address like 192.168.*.* since thats a private ip (used only inside a private network, not valid on the Internet). This is one thing.

Now, as per ur thoughts, if we put A to be say (again, just for now, bcoz this is a private ip). The WAN side of A is on the network / Now if u assign the address to B, this becomes part of the same subnet. To my knowledge, you need to make the WAN and LAN different subnets. So that means, you assign a different range of addresses to B C D, like,,

Again, on the OTHER side of B, C and D (other side is the one not connected to A, the LAN side), you need to give out addresses that is NOT on the same subnet as the connection between B and A, C and A, D and A. For example, u could start from for B's clients. Note that, the LAN side of B will have an address Similarly, in the above paragraph, you should've made as the LAN side address of A itself.

I'm trying to think aloud now... what happens if we do assign addresses like the way you wanted. A packet comes from the outside destined to, which is B in your case. But it has to come thru M-> A connection. Now to A, the subnet is the connection between A and M, and NOT A and B. So I think it'll just assume the client is not present and drop the packet (?). May be I'm thinking a bit too much, but if ur configuration doesn't work for u, think along these lines, and try whatever I said.

Hope it makes sense.
Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.

Join & Write a Comment

Featured Post

The new generation of project management tools

With monday.com’s project management tool, you can see what everyone on your team is working in a single glance. Its intuitive dashboards are customizable, so you can create systems that work for you.

  • 2
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now