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Getting Microseconds from Date

Hi, we hold timestamps in our datavase in the following format: 2004-02-13:10:28:45.530374, trouble is that when we try to use  simpleDateFormat with the format yyyy-MM-dd hh:mm:ss.SSSSSS it doesnt work since it only goes upto milliseconds not microseconds.

Is there a way I can get the microseconds?
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Chriseybaby
Asked:
Chriseybaby
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1 Solution
 
CEHJCommented:
Microseconds are not supported in Java dates
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StillUnAwareCommented:
That's a good one, 0 minutes in answering a question :)
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Mayank SAssociate Director - Product EngineeringCommented:
The best I know is System.nanoTime () ; but that's nanoseconds.... the Date class does not support micro-seconds.
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YagantappaCommented:
You can make use of java.sql.Timestamp.
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ChriseybabyAuthor Commented:
Thanks for your help, looks like its going to have to be the timestamp, very annoying tho...
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CEHJCommented:
>>looks like its going to have to be the timestamp

That won't work either. Timestamp only supports milliseconds
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Mayank SAssociate Director - Product EngineeringCommented:
TimeStamp has a method called getNanos () but that wouldn't get the microsecond component.
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StillUnAwareCommented:
What are You talking about, not a single OS internally can count the time so exactly, I guess the shortest period of time which can be accessed is milisecond.
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Mayank SAssociate Director - Product EngineeringCommented:
Well I haven't used the getNanos () method of TimeStamp but probably that is what Yagantappa meant. In any case, like I said - it will not solve the problem because whether it gets the nanoseconds or not, it cannot get the microseconds. System.nanoTime () says "Returns the current value of the most precise available system timer, in nanoseconds".
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YagantappaCommented:
Not all databases support micro seconds. Oracle 10g support micro seconds. I tried the following program and it worked fine

Table in Oracle database
CREATE TABLE TEST_TIMESTAMP (
    T1      TIMESTAMP(6) NULL
    )
GO

Here is the test java code and its output

        Timestamp ts = new Timestamp(106, 06, 10, 10, 10, 10, 213286789);
        System.out.println("ts = " + ts);
        Class.forName ("oracle.jdbc.driver.OracleDriver");
        Connection conn = DriverManager.getConnection("jdbc:oracle:thin:@xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx:xxxx:xxxX", "xxxxxx", "xxxxxx");
        Statement stmt = conn.createStatement();
        PreparedStatement p = conn.prepareStatement("update test_timestamp set t1 = ?");
        p.setTimestamp(1, ts);
        p.execute();
        ResultSet rs = stmt.executeQuery("select * from test_timestamp");
        while (rs.next())
        {
            System.out.println("column 1 = " + rs.getTimestamp(1));
        }

Output
--------
ts = 2006-07-10 10:10:10.213286789
column 1 = 2006-07-10 10:10:10.213287
column 1 = 2006-07-10 10:10:10.213287
column 1 = 2006-07-10 10:10:10.213287
column 1 = 2006-07-10 10:10:10.213287
column 1 = 2006-07-10 10:10:10.213287
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ChriseybabyAuthor Commented:
I havent tried using it yet, just hoped it would work.

The problem is, after I get the data from the data base I lose the last little bit of the timestamp. Therefore when I try to compare the 2 they are different. I could use a like query but would prefer to find a solution.

Maybe if I save it as a string I might be able to get around it...
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CEHJCommented:
>>I tried the following program and it worked fine

That's all OK but Chriseybaby's question specifies that s/he is using it in conjunction with Date. That's not possible, as Date only supports ms
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Mayank SAssociate Director - Product EngineeringCommented:
>> I havent tried using it yet, just hoped it would work.

You shouldn't close the question until you've confirmed that the answer is correct :) many people will have many suggestions and you can't say which one is going to work until you try them. Anyway, if this one does, its great :)
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objectsCommented:
Timestamp should work fine.
If the column in the database is a timestamp that supports the accuracy you need, then use getTimestamp() to retrieve it.
If its stored as a string then split the string (d.split("\\.")) when you extract it and parse the regular date/time (2004-02-13:10:28:45) with SDF and store it in a Timestamp, and parse the rest (530374) as an int and set the nanoseconds on your parsed Timestamp using setNanos() method.
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