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VMWARE and host not seeing vmware in networking

I have VMWARE loading an domain controller (Domain.Name is a windows 2003 server).
i setup vmware ethernet connectivity to use NAT.  I login to that domain controller
and issue an ipconfig command in a dos prompt.  it shows me an ip address.
I then switch to an dos prompt on my local xp workstation that is hosting vmware sessions and
then try to ping that ip address from the domain controller.  I get "Request Timed Out".  I tried pinging the DC name (e.g. ping Domain.Name) and I get "Ping request could not find host Domain.Name.  Please check the name and try again."

Any ideas?

I'm using VMWare 5.5.1 build 19175 and windows XP Professional with SP 2.
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rdevalco
Asked:
rdevalco
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2 Solutions
 
papimichelCommented:
change the network card's connection type to bridged.
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jhanceCommented:
Using NAT means that the VM is "hidden" behind the virtual network adapter on a private IP range.  So neither your host machine nor any other machine will see it.  The VM, of course can see "out" of the NAT but other hosts cannot see in.

You usually would only use this for client-only VMs.  Since you have installed a server OS you probably want another option.

As mentioned, what you want to do is to use the BRIDGED network option.  This will put your VM on the same network as the host where it will get an IP from your DHCP server or you will assign it a static IP that is a part of your network.
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papimichelCommented:
when its on bridged mode it gets an ip address from your lan (if there is a DHCP server).
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dlmarioCommented:
Hello,

when you are using NAT, the vmkernel is routing between two networks using masquerading. That means that the vmware network controller has an ip of your local network an the virtual machines are getting an ip of another network segment.

For example: You have the IP address 192.168.1.2 with the netmask 255.255.255.0 and your default gateway is 192.168.1.1. That means, that each system in the network 192.168.1.x is direct reachable for your vmware server. The vmware server interface uses the ip 192.168.1.3 for example.
Each virtual machine is unsing one other network, for example 10.1.1.x (netmask 255.255.255.0), so a v-server is getting the 10.1.1.2.
Now you can reach the vm-outside network from every v-server but NOT the other way. For the v-server is the whole network a valid destination. But the vmware host system is only seing the ip 192.168.1.3 an not 10.1.1.2.

So NAT is no solution for you setup. Use a bridged connection instead. A bridge ober the vm-network interface an the local networkinterface is acting like a kind of switch between the interfaces. So the vmnet interface is not using an own ip address. But now you can configure an ip address of your local subnet to the virtual machine (192.168.1.10 in my example).

/Mario
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