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LogFactory and Log

First off, let me state I'm not a Java programmer.  I'm integrating some ASP .NET code with a Java Web App.  

My question is about the following line:

private static Log log  = LogFactory.getLog (myclass.class);

and then they use log.error(e) or log.debug....etc.

My question is, is this creating an actual log file somewhere on the system?  I want to be able to check it for errors if indeed that's what it's for.

Thanks.
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moonshot
Asked:
moonshot
1 Solution
 
objectsCommented:
the definition of the actually logger that will be written to will be in yourt loggoing config file, it may be going to a log file or it may not.
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Jim CakalicSenior Developer/ArchitectCommented:
There /probably/ is a log file. That is the most common logging destination although Java logging systems can also log to a variety of other destinations. Since your example was with LogFactory, my suspicion is that the web app uses the jakarta commons-logging api (http://jakarta.apache.org/commons/logging/guide.html). This is a wrapper api that abstracts other logging subsystems. It doesn't actually do the logging itself. It delegates that activity to another logging package. It primarily came about because for quite some time the standard Java runtime class libraries did not include a specific logging api and various alternatives were advanced. As of JDK 1.4, there is the java.util.logging package (http://java.sun.com/j2se/1.4.2/docs/guide/util/logging/). Another very popular logging api is log4j (http://logging.apache.org/log4j/docs/).

If you look at the commons-logging guide, it has a section on configuration. This section will help you to understand how commons-logging discovers the logging api that it will wrap. You can go through the same process to figure out which logging package is actually being used. The other links will help you in understanding the configuration of log4j and java.util.logging and, assuming that the logging destination is actually a file, what that file is named and where it may be found.

Regards,
Jim Cakalic
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Mayank SAssociate Director - Product EngineeringCommented:
Yes, the log-file has to be defined somewhere - check your configuration and properties-files.
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