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Join two wifi wireless networks

Posted on 2006-06-16
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Last Modified: 2013-11-24

Hello,

I have a wireless Netgear 802.11g ADSL router connected to my telephone connection in one room in my house.

In another room I have a second 802.11g wireless router, which also has a four port switch/hub built in (it is a dlink di-624M).

I would like the two wifi networks to be part of the same layer 2 network, so that if I have a device connected by ethernet into the Dlink device, it can still get across the wifi network to the Netgear, and out of the ADSL internet connection.  Can I achieve this with what I have, or do I need to do something else?

So the traffic path would be:

PC---[cat5 cable]--->Dlink---[802.11g]--->Netgear---[ADSL]--->Internet

Thanks,

Paul
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Question by:muff
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by:jhance
ID: 16919302
These consumer models of AP/router don't support this feature.  You need to look at one of the more sophisticated models that are designed for this purpose.  Try 3COM or Cisco.  They both offer models that do this but be aware that they are much more expensive than the Netgear units you have now.
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by:Mrkaras
ID: 16919697
does the netgear have any cat5 connections and do you have a eperate ADSL modem or is it integrated into the netgear router?

I am thinking you may be able to remove one of the routers
PC---[cat5 cable]--->Netgear---[ADSL]--->Internet
or
PC---[cat5 cable]--->Dlink--->Modem--[ADSL]--->Internet

though these ideas may require running some more cable.
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JJT2750 earned 250 total points
ID: 16919965
Hi Paul,

What you are trying to do is called a Wireless Bridge they do work very nicely because I have built a few of them.

Router to router will not work, Ap to Router will not work, AP to AP will work or if the manufacturer of the DSL modem makes a range extender that might work I would have to see the features.

Another suggestion that I have might be to take one of the PCs that you have plugged into the 4 port switch install a wireless card in it and bridge the two adapters (Microsoft has made this real easy in XP) this would turn the PC into a network bridge that would talk to your Netgear wireless router in the other room, it would also allow anything plugged into the switch to connect to the router and Internet through it.  

TO bridge the two connection you would need to:

1. Install the wireless card configure it and connect it to the router.  
2.  Next I would goto start\settings\control panel\network connections
3. Highlight both the connections that would be the ethernet and the wireless connection
4. Right click on them and choose bridge connections.
5. Reboot

When it comes back up it will be a Network Bridge (which is what all access points are)

Good Luck I hope this helps.


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by:muff
ID: 16920881

jhance: thanks for the info

Mrkaras:  Thanks, running cable is what I am hoping to avoid.  But to answer your question, yes the Netgear is a combined AP and ADSL modem.

JJT2750:  Could you clarify the distinction between a router and access point in the context above?   Both the Netgear DG834T and the D-Link DI-624M are considered access points.  But they both route also.  It would seem to me that if the SSIDs were the same on both access points, and the radio channel and encryption methods were all the same, then essentially they would be part of the same broadcast domain - the same layer 2.  This is what you would expect from a wired network anyway.

Adding a network card to a PC and bridging is a compromise worth considering, but I would prefer not to have to rely on a PC to be a critical part of the network.

If I need to join the networks together do I have any other option other than buying yet another AP?
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by:JJT2750
ID: 16924582
An AP is basically the bridge with no routing at all you plug it in to your network and basically it is a switch that extends  your network to your wireless clients.   A router hsa a local network and a wan port that will connect 2 networks., it can provide nat,, dhcp, vpn connections,   and yes it acts as an access point.   I saw the Netgear  WPN824 router and replaced my Belkin Access Point with the WPN824 come to find out it stopped talking to my AP in the garage  I thought the same thing it should be easy but it's not.  After doing some research I discovered that APs will talk to APs routers will not talk to AP's .  Short of buying some new hardware  I think the PC bridge  is looking like the better option.
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by:muff
ID: 16925623

So are you saying that with the Belkin and another AP in the garage, you achieved what I want?

That the two APs formed a single wireless network?  So if you were associated with one AP, you could see devices associated with the other AP?

Did you have to configure anything to make this happen?

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by:JJT2750
ID: 16926393
I had 2 Belkin APs  1 was plugged into a port on my  Router in the house the other into a switch in the Garage. All my dhcp was coming from my router in the house.  In the garage  all I had turned on was the AP  anything I had plugged into the switch got an address and went out my internet connection which was located off  another interface on my router.  
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by:JJT2750
ID: 16926799
I just configured security wpa -psk and it looked like this

network--->Belkin(F5d7130)---[Wireless]--->Belkin(F5D7130)---network--Router--->Internet


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