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find command

Posted on 2006-06-16
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Last Modified: 2013-12-27
Hi,

how do we find "all" files which are most recently modified in size or made e.g in last day or last two days.
If we run a find command on root, will the system attempt to find the file in the nfs mounted partitions only? looks as it does. If so what is the switch for running ot on a local system.


Regards
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Question by:naufal
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tfewster earned 50 total points
ID: 16923006
Find options:
-mtime -3    (modified less than 3 days ago)
-local or -fstype ufs
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Author Comment

by:naufal
ID: 16923027
tx
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Expert Comment

by:jonaslinden
ID: 16923077
Hi,

The "find" command should work. To find files starting at root modified within the last day run:
  find / -ctime 1                          


The find command looks in all mounted filesystems local or NFS if you search from root (/).

To search only local filesystems use the -local switch on Solaris:
  find / -name "*.log" -local
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