Solved

Oracle Timestamp size ?

Posted on 2006-06-16
5
5,374 Views
Last Modified: 2008-01-09
Hi,
I have an Oracle (9.2.0) table column that is of type Timestamp...

The DBA declared it as:

ColumnName      Type
CREATETMS       Timestamp(6)

My question is: what does this mean?     Timestamp(6)  ?
Give me an example insert value to insert a value to this column??? (should work)
I am having problem updating this Timestamp with new values from my java program....


Thanks.
_Esam.
0
Comment
Question by:_Esam
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
  • 3
5 Comments
 
LVL 11

Accepted Solution

by:
pennnn earned 125 total points
ID: 16923469
From the manual:
http://download-west.oracle.com/docs/cd/B10501_01/server.920/a96540/sql_elements2a.htm#47861
---
The TIMESTAMP datatype is an extension of the DATE datatype. It stores the year, month, and day of the DATE datatype, plus hour, minute, and second values. This datatype is useful for storing precise time values. Specify the TIMESTAMP datatype as follows:

TIMESTAMP [(fractional_seconds_precision)]

where fractional_seconds_precision optionally specifies the number of digits Oracle stores in the fractional part of the SECOND datetime field. When you create a column of this datatype, the value can be a number in the range 0 to 9. The default is 6. When you specify TIMESTAMP as a literal, the fractional_seconds_precision value can be any number of digits up to 9, as follows:

TIMESTAMP'1997-01-31 09:26:50.124'
---
An example of an insert would be:
insert into my_table (timestamp_column) values (timestamp'1997-01-31 09:26:50.124');

Hope that helps!
0
 
LVL 19

Expert Comment

by:actonwang
ID: 16923479
TIMESTAMP [(<precision>)]

The TIMESTAMP datatype stores date and time information with fractional
seconds precision. The only difference between the DATE and TIMESTAMP
datatypes is the ability to store fractional seconds up to a precision of nine digits.
The default precision is 6 and can range from 0 to 9.
0
 

Author Comment

by:_Esam
ID: 16923799
>insert into my_table (timestamp_column) values (timestamp'1997-01-31 09:26:50.124');

Is this part ok:   (timestamp'1997-01-31 09:26:50.124'); ?

Should it just be:   ('1997-01-31 09:26:50.124');


_Esam
0
 

Author Comment

by:_Esam
ID: 16923851
Need an example of how to insert a darn timestamp>>>:)


Thax.
_esam.
0
 

Author Comment

by:_Esam
ID: 16923878
Sorry, I got it working now...:)

Thanks

_Esam..
0

Featured Post

Industry Leaders: We Want Your Opinion!

We value your feedback.

Take our survey and automatically be enter to win anyone of the following:
Yeti Cooler, Amazon eGift Card, and Movie eGift Card!

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Working with Network Access Control Lists in Oracle 11g (part 1) Part 2: http://www.e-e.com/A_9074.html So, you upgraded to a shiny new 11g database and all of a sudden every program that used UTL_MAIL, UTL_SMTP, UTL_TCP, UTL_HTTP or any oth…
Working with Network Access Control Lists in Oracle 11g (part 2) Part 1: http://www.e-e.com/A_8429.html Previously, I introduced the basics of network ACL's including how to create, delete and modify entries to allow and deny access.  For many…
This video shows how to set up a shell script to accept a positional parameter when called, pass that to a SQL script, accept the output from the statement back and then manipulate it in the Shell.
Video by: Steve
Using examples as well as descriptions, step through each of the common simple join types, explaining differences in syntax, differences in expected outputs and showing how the queries run along with the actual outputs based upon a simple set of dem…

734 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question