Computing power per user?

How do I calculate computing power needed per user?

For instance, a small office with five email power users who want Win2k3 SBS can use a less powerful server than a company with 30 employees you just you regular email. (I am of course referring to exchange).

Then add in the company database, file server, etc....

How do I compute what speed CPU, and how many CPUs are appropriate for the business? How do I computer how much RAM to stick in there?
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Lee W, MVPConnect With a Mentor Technology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
I don't think you'll find a good standard answer.  It really depends on what kind of system you need.  Will the server need to handle SQL server?  Are they light users of email or heavy?  Are they working with a few small files or very large ones?  Is the web site running off the server and is it heavily used or not?  There are too many variables to come up with a good simple answer - that's why you hire a consultant to review the system and decide.

In short, based on my experience in large enterprises, a high-end multicore processor with 2-4 GB of RAM running a SCSI RAID 5 or RAID 10 should be more than enough for MOST businesses.  And certain aspects can always be moved off to another server if it turns out this one can't handle it - for example, file server, web server, and other services can be put on other systems.

Again it really depends on how the company in question is going to work with the server.  I have several clients running SBS on low end servers handling between 3 and 15 users without issue (low end = 1 GB RAM, software Mirror ATA/SATA storage, ~2GH worth of processor power).
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