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Exchange Connectors

Posted on 2006-06-21
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Last Modified: 2008-03-04
I would like to know when we should create one type of the connectors and not the other.

Routing Group Connector
SMTP Connector
TCP X.400 Connector
X25 X.400 Connector
Dirsync requestor
Dirsync Server

Thanks,

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Question by:jskfan
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Expert Comment

by:Sembee
ID: 16959107
Most sites will only use an SMTP Connector.
The others are used in very specific circumstances - usually to co-exist with other NON EXCHANGE servers.
Routing Group connectors are used to connect Exchange routing groups together.

Simon.
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Author Comment

by:jskfan
ID: 16959383
<<<<Most sites will only use an SMTP Connector.
Routing Group connectors are used to connect Exchange routing groups together>>>>

let's say we have 3 routing groups in different geographical regions. Do I have to use SMTP connectors or Toruting group connector or both?


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Expert Comment

by:Sembee
ID: 16959801
SMTP Connector are for outbound email.
Routing group connectors connect the routing groups.
You would probably have both in use, but they aren't a replacement. SMTP Connectors are one way things (out) whereas Routing Groups are two way.

Simon.
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Author Comment

by:jskfan
ID: 16960719
<<<<You would probably have both in use, but they aren't a replacement. SMTP Connectors are one way things (out) whereas Routing Groups are two way. >>>

could you illustrate this more in details please?
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Expert Comment

by:Sembee
ID: 16961841
The transport and routing guide explains everything that you need to know.
http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/exchange/2003/library/extransrout.mspx

Simon.
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Author Comment

by:jskfan
ID: 16962091
I have been reading exactely the same guide.
and we have an exchange server in one geographical location and the other one in a different geographical location.

I see that 2 routing groups are configured.
In each routing group there is one exchange server, one routing group connector and one SMTP connector.

I need some clear explanation from someone who has hands in experience,as you know the guides have too much fluff.


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Expert Comment

by:Sembee
ID: 16962333
You have to read the fluff.
How do you think that people learn what is happening?

The routing group connector connects the two routing groups. It gives you control over how the routing group connectors communicate. Can be useful in low bandwidth environments.

The SMTP Connector deals with outbound email.
The SMTP Connector allows you to control the flow of SMTP traffic that is leaving your Exchange org. They are either Routing Group wide or Exchange org wide.

For example, you could have an SMTP Connector that has a frontend server listed as the bridgehead that has a scope of the routing group. That would mean that all email sent from a server in that routing group would go out through that server.

If the SMTP Connector scope was Exchange org, then all outbound email would use that connectors settings to send email. That could mean that email is being transferred over a slower connection when there is a faster connection available.

Furthermore, you could also setup a smart host on that SMTP Connector - so that the server listed as the bridgehead sent all of its email through the smart host. What the SMTP Connector lets you do is send email in a direction other than than what can be found by DNS.

Exchange ignores the SMTP Connector for sending internal traffic - replication and traffic to other Exchange servers.

Simon.
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Author Comment

by:jskfan
ID: 16962494
So in our environment case:

the routing group connectors connect(logically) each routing group  for each geographical region
each routing group can route emails through the specified SMTP connector of the routing group.

is this how  it works?
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Author Comment

by:jskfan
ID: 16962505
Note that our exchange server even though are in 2 different geographical regions but the are in the same organisation.
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LVL 104

Expert Comment

by:Sembee
ID: 16963179
SMTP Connectors and Routing group connectors are not reliant on each other.
You can use Routing group connectors without SMTP Connectors and vice versa.

The SMTP Connector is just for outbound email - ie email that is leaving the Exchange org.
Routing group connector is for internal email - whether that is outbound from the server (to another server) or inbound to the server (from another server).

The only link between the two is to use the routing group (NOT the routing group connector) to limit the scope of the SMTP Connector.

Simon.
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Author Comment

by:jskfan
ID: 16963447
this might be the last question I hope.

we have a parentdomain.com and a childdomain.parentdomain.com
on exchange server in the parentdomain and one exchange server in childdomain.

in ESM , I can see 2 routing groups
PRT routing group that has 2 connectors (routing group connector and SMTP connector)
and under members one exchange server PRTserver

CHLD routing group that has 2 connectors (routing group connector and SMTP connector)
and under members one exchange server CHLDserver

PRTserver and CHLDserver are both exchange servers one in Florida another one in California.

considering this environment:
How does the email flow? if there was just one routing group would it be enough?  if there were no SMTP connectors, would it work?

thanks







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Accepted Solution

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Sembee earned 500 total points
ID: 16964361
You could have one routing group. I have seen that done before.
However if you are running multiple geographical sites then it is easier to manage the traffic with routing groups.

The SMTP Connector allows each routing group to be responsible for email delivery. If it was me doing it then I would probably have an internet connection on both sites and get external email to go straight out, rather than going over any WAN link. That would of course be dependant on the internet link being suitable, DNS configured correctly etc.

Simon.
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Author Comment

by:jskfan
ID: 16965219
Thanks a lot for your efforts
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