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what does // mean in Linux path?

Posted on 2006-06-21
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Hi,

what does "mkdir /home/test/util//" do other than mkdir util/?

The complete command in Linux is:
mkdir -p /home/jess/rg-4.1.7/rg/build.CENTAUR/pkg/include/util//
&& ln -sfn /home/jess/rg-4.1.7/rg/pkg/util/test_lang.c /home/jess/rg-4.1.7/rg/build.CENTAUR/pkg/include/util//test_lang.c

Thank you in advance,
Jessica
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Question by:sctccomm
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5 Comments
 
LVL 8

Expert Comment

by:Autogard
ID: 16953912
The extra slashes should not be a problem at all in Linux.  it will just treat it as just one slash.

e.g.

"mkdir ~/something2//////" just creates "something2"
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Expert Comment

by:Autogard
ID: 16953941
Also, in certain protocols two forward slashes can mean a network location, but that doesn't apply in your example.
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Assisted Solution

by:Autogard
Autogard earned 600 total points
ID: 16954009
So:

mkdir -p /home/jess/rg-4.1.7/rg/build.CENTAUR/pkg/include/util//
&& ln -sfn /home/jess/rg-4.1.7/rg/pkg/util/test_lang.c /home/jess/rg-4.1.7/rg/build.CENTAUR/pkg/include/util//test_lang.c

should be the same as:

mkdir -p /home/jess/rg-4.1.7/rg/build.CENTAUR/pkg/include/util/
&& ln -sfn /home/jess/rg-4.1.7/rg/pkg/util/test_lang.c /home/jess/rg-4.1.7/rg/build.CENTAUR/pkg/include/util/test_lang.c

or even:

mkdir -p /home/jess/rg-4.1.7/rg/build.CENTAUR/pkg/include/util//////////
&& ln -sfn /home/jess/rg-4.1.7/rg/pkg/util/test_lang.c /home/jess/rg-4.1.7/rg/build.CENTAUR/pkg/include/util//////////////test_lang.c

for that matter.  Give it a try.
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LVL 7

Assisted Solution

by:NetExpert
NetExpert earned 600 total points
ID: 16954066
It's the same thing, a double slashes // is considered the same as single / when use in dir path/name.
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LVL 7

Accepted Solution

by:
aib_42 earned 800 total points
ID: 16954420
The double directory seperators are a common off-by-1 mistake. Shell scripts that take, say, the name of a directory name and do something with it often append a trailing seperator:
rm $1/file.ext
del %1\file.ext

But not always; some of them want it to be supplied in the argument:
rm $1file.ext
del %1file.ext

So the best practice for a user is to put a trailing slash anyway, since it will work in both cases (as superfluous seperators are simply ignored.)
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