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Vertical monitor orientation in Linux

Posted on 2006-06-21
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Last Modified: 2012-06-22
I currently have 2 20" widescreen monitors running under linux. I would love to use them vertically, instead of horizantally, but cannot figure out how to make it work. I assume it will require some updates to xorg.conf. Anyone have any experience with this?


Thanks in advance!
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Question by:timdr
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by:pjedmond
ID: 16955205
Depends on whether your graphics card supports it. Normally ,though it is an entry in the device bit of the xorg.conf such as:

Section "Device"
Identifier "nvidia"
Driver "nvidia"
Option "RandRRotation"
EndSection

For an nvidia card.

You can just try the Option "RandRRotation" entry and see if it works, or look through this list of various directives (and other possibilities) for both XFree86 and Xorg:

http://www.winischhofer.at/linuxsispart2.shtml

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csgeekpyro earned 500 total points
ID: 16962556
Assuming you have 2 screens set up...something like this should work with xorg:

Screen 0 "Main"
Screen 1 "Secondary" Below "Main"

Read your xorg.conf manpage for where this stuff goes.  It's basically the same for anyone who want's em side-by-side, except they'd use "Secondary" LeftOf "Main" instead.
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