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Recommend a memory profiler

Posted on 2006-06-22
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Last Modified: 2010-04-16
Hi,

this isn't a mega-points question because I'm only interested in opinions here.

We have a large application that has been created with mostly managed code, although it also runs unmanaged code, some of which we have written, other parts are libraries (eg device drivers).

The application works with heavy Bitmap object traffic  - creating, and destroying where it seems appropiate. However, we are getting some pretty big memory leaks. Some of the areas of leaks can be found using common sense, others are harder to find.

I'd like to know about tools that we could use to help us with the problem. I am aware that for unmanaged code there are some pretty powerfull profilers out there that can even tell you exactly where the application is leaking - compiling the project with the profiler libs etc...

For .NET however, these kind of highly developed tools are hard to find. I have seen one called

.NET Memory Profiler (http://www.scitech.se/)

Any comments?
Any comments on the practise of handling Bitmap objects in .NET?

Thanks.
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Question by:Daeljan
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Assisted Solution

by:mastoo
mastoo earned 20 total points
ID: 16961378
The Compuware product works nice, although it is expensive.  I recently eval'd one from red-gate.com and it looked good also and is relatively cheap.
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vo1d earned 30 total points
ID: 16964372
this one is very nice:
http://www.automatedqa.com/products/aqtime/

another one is this one, but i prefer the first:
http://www.red-gate.com/products/ants_profiler/
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by:vo1d
ID: 16964408
are those bitmaps managed or unmanaged objects?
if its managed, have you called the bitmap dispose() method?
you have to keep in mind, that also you have called a dispose method the memory is not freed just in time like a free in c or a delete in c++.
the object is marked for cleanup and will be moved by time in the next generation so the gc will free that memory at any time.
in the worst case, the gc will free that memory if the system memory got low.

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by:Daeljan
ID: 17120030
Thanks for the insiight. Points spit according to the contribution - like I said originally, theres no 'right' answer to this question.

BTW, we bought the SciTech profiler in the the end - not bad for the money. I think that .NETs approach to handing bitmaps with regards to memory management is badly implemented, but thats just my opinion.
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