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building new system, old hard drive?

Posted on 2006-06-24
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Last Modified: 2010-04-26
Hi Experts,

my motherboard bit the dust recently so i decided to build a new system, my question is can i use my existing hard drive? with all my software and files on it or do i need a new hard drive? if so how do i copy all my files and folders to the new drive.
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Question by:rralph
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LVL 54

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b0lsc0tt earned 100 total points
ID: 16976898
rralph,

As long as your hard drive was not damaged then you can still use it.  You may need to reinstall Windows or reenter its CD key when you start with the new motherboard and processor.  Those steps will depend on your operating system.  If you would like more information about that then let us know what operating system you are using.

b0lsc0tt
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Expert Comment

by:Ryan_Brown
ID: 16976945
if you used a damaged old hd on a new system, what would happen? are those files on that old damaged hd gone forever?
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Expert Comment

by:callrs
ID: 16976996
You can get 500 GB hard drives now. At the minimum you should have 80 GB, so if your old drive is under 80 GB, don't use it as the only drive in your new system.

Re-install the operating system (OS) onto a new drive, but install BOTH drives in the new computer. That way you still have access to all the files -- with or without copying what you want over to the new drive (e.g. using Windows Explorer or xxcopy www.xxcopy.com)

Using the same drive in a new computer -- You can do it, but the OS may complain & cause trouble. Besides, a fresh install means you start off with a cleaner system.
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by:PUNKY
ID: 16977021
If you still can boot up from old computer, go to device manager, look for IDE ATA/ATAPI Controller. There, right click on Intel or whatever storage controller is, choose update driver. A "Welcome Hardware Update Wizard" appears, choose "Install from a list ...", click next. Choose option "I will choose driver to install..", click next. Choose Standard Dual Channel PCI IDE Controller, click next, and OK. Restart system if needed.

Now, you remove the drive out of your old system, and install on new system, you will have to install drivers for it (use CD drivers that comes with new system). You wont need to do repair or reinstall windows.
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LVL 54

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by:b0lsc0tt
ID: 16977022
I'm glad that I could help!  Thank you for the grade, the points and the fun question.  

By the way, I would be cautious of following a suggestion to upgrade the size of your hard drive when we don't know your operating system, etc.  The suggestion may have been made with good intentions but could cause problems.  If you are interested in that option and want help with that then you could start a new question.

bol
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