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% system ASP used

Posted on 2006-06-26
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Last Modified: 2012-06-21
1) I'm application developer on as/400 have no idea about system
administrator job. I have questions our As/400 test server saw % %
system ASP used 93.9898 . Our system admin. left the company last
week. I'm trying to figure it out what I need to do get this % down on
test server.

2) We are planning to upgrade our old machine (810) to 510 next weekend. Any idea? What we need to keep in mind to prevent any problem ?


 Please advise
 Thank you so much in advance
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Question by:expertsit
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Expert Comment

by:daveslater
ID: 16986942
Hi
the simpet answer is by more disks.

What you can check are the following librarues:
QRPLOBJ - these are tempory objects kept by the system after compiles etc.

check for save files
WRKF then f4
select all and allusr then file type savf
Back them up and delete them.

You can aslo check for deleted records in files and reorganise them.

delete old spool files.

These are not going to eat into the 93% and the system works best at under 70%.

Dave
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tliotta earned 125 total points
ID: 16987128
expertsit:

First step would be to determine whether that's too high or not. It probably is too high, but you might have a sufficiently large system where it's acceptable in a "test" environment.

Next, use the GO CLEANUP menu to make sure that normal cleanup is being done of general system logs and other items. This might not do much depending on how much DASD the system has, or it might be _the_ problem on a smaller active system. A CLEANUP job would normally run middle-of-the-night, so you wouldn't usually see immediate results.

A test sytem might collect a _bunch_ of stuff in QRPLOBJ as test versions are recreated during development. Many system-level jobs can also use a lot of space. Both of those can be handled by more frequent IPLs. Lots a basic cleanup is done during an IPL. Most system jobs get cleaned up simply when dropping into restricted state. QRPLOBJ should normally only be cleared by IPL (but objects can be manually deleted if you choose; just avoid a full CLRLIB on QRPLOBJ since system functions can use the library).

An IPL clears most temporary allocated space and can make things look real good. However, there is always an amount of temp space used by a normally running system. A day or so after IPL, you should see as much space back in use as you should expect. The 24-48 hour rise in temp space is a number to remember. That helps you judge future cleanup.

If CLEANUP options are properly set, you probably no longer need be concerned about QHST* log files and related elements. But it's possible that an excessively large number were created during some testing. You might review how many QHST* files exist and delete ones that aren't really necessary. (Ideally these would show as having been backed up.)

You might run WRKOUTQ OUTQ(*ALL) to see if spooled files are not being deleted. These usually aren't major space hogs, but can be if they are very large or very numerous. After major deletions of spooled files, you might run RCLSPLSTG in case excessive storage blocks got allocated in the past.

So far, these are mostly small items. Today's systems have much more DASD in comparison to what those elements usually use. But basic cleanup is never a bad idea.

You might create a list of journals on your system with a command like:

 ==>  wrkobj  *all/*all  *jrn

Getting to know what journals exist helps you to plan for managing them. Many are created as system-managed journals and also allow the system to delete receivers when they're no longer needed. But user-managed journals may need intervention if receivers are regularly generated. Receivers _should_ be part of a regular backup strategy. This makes them much easier to delete and helps when recovering space.

A test system might have QAUDJRN with huge numbers of receiver entries as objects get copied, recreated, deleted, authorized, you name it. QAUDJRN receivers can take up the majority of used space on some systems.

Nowadays, streamfiles and directories can have a major impact. If you have Qshell installed, you can create a bunch of reports on directory contents to see what might be unnecessary. If you don't have Qshell, you should install it if for no other reason than this.

You should also have RTVDSKINF run on probably a weekly basis. Run it overnight on weekends to collect basic info that can be compared week by week to track where space is being used. Info is collected with RTVDSKINF and reported by PRTDSKINF. There is also RTVDIRINF and PRTDIRINF if you have a recent enough version of OS/400; this is oriented to the IFS in general.

PRTDSKINF/PRTDIRINF can be your major source of info on what needs to be done. But if the RTV* commands haven't been run, then there's no collected info available.

Hope that gives you enough general stuff to work with. I'm sure others can follow up with detail as needed.

Tom


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Expert Comment

by:_b_h
ID: 16988701

Some of this duplicates Tom's comments, but here goes.

Retrieving the disk and directory information is a good idea. Hunt down the largest objects in the reports to get the most space back the fastest.
WRKJRNRCV *ALL gives the list of journal receivers on the system, where a lot of space can be wasted.

How much total disk is on the system? The auxiliary storage threshold used to default to 90%, but with today's large disk pools, per cent used can climb higher than 90 without imminent threat of the system halting when it reaches 100. For example, on a 1 Terabyte system, 10 per cent of space free is likely more than enough working storage.

From a performance point of view, the arm busy level is more important than the actual amount of space used. Performance is related to how active the data is, not much of it there is. A lot of history data that is rarely accessed will take a long time to affect performance.

For the 810 to 510 upgrade, make sure a full system save is done beforehand:
GO SAVE, then option 21
Make sure you understand what hardware changes are happening. Will there be a load source migration? Will disk protection be stopped and restarted? At any rate, the full system save should be done or some other recovery strategy be in place, in case things go horribly wrong.

Barry
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Expert Comment

by:tliotta
ID: 16996661
As for the 810-to-510 upgrade, simple personal experience makes me strongly recommend that you not upgrade OS/400 version at the same time you do the hardware upgrade if at all possible. Do OS/400 upgrade separate from the hardware. Bring your current system up to a release of OS/400 that's supported on the new hardware first. THEN migrate that to the new hardware. (We just went through a couple nightmares around that in the past couple weeks.)

It isn't always possible, but it can be very well worth it if you can do it.

Tom
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