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hard drive space

Posted on 2006-06-26
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Last Modified: 2010-04-19
I have a windows 2003 server. the server was installed with 15gb for c drive and 53 left unpartioned. i am in disk management I made the 53 available how do i add it to the c: please help asap
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Question by:zenworksb
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Lee W, MVP earned 500 total points
ID: 16987728
You reinstall the server and create one large partition.  BUT, this is NOT a good idea.  15 GB is more than sufficient for 99% of all server installations, in my opinion.  If you think you need more, why?  Your Data should NOT reside on C: - it should reside on another partition, such as D: or whatever other drive letter you wish to use.

You can try using software like Partition Magic or Partition Commander to resize the C: drive - but read their directions - which includes explicit instructions to BACKUP FIRST - because any time you mess with partitions, you can create additional problems and POSSIBLY make the system unrecoverable, forcing a reinstall.
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by:maUru
ID: 16987795
windows cannot merge i think

partition magic is the easiest (but costly option)

otherwise http://www.google.com/search?q=free+partition+manager+ntfs

should have some

remember to backup before doing ANYTHING with the partitions
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Expert Comment

by:ingetic
ID: 16987938
is your disk BASIC or DYNAMIC ?

if dynamic,
simply click on the partition (on disk administrator), then choose 'extend' ....

if not, change disk to dynamic and try to extend after a reboot

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by:Lee W, MVP
ID: 16987953
ingetic - you cannot extend the system drive.  You can extend other disks, but not the system disk, via disk administrator.
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Expert Comment

by:itcoza
ID: 16988007
Hi zenworksb,

Microsoft seems to think that the boot and system partition cannot be expanded once they are in use.  http://support.microsoft.com/?id=325857 describes how you can perform this process during a installation or an upgrade. But, if all you are looking to do is to add the 53GB to become available for use as a part of C: drive, you have also got the option to create the partition and to then mount it to an empty NTFS folder on C: drive.  This will allow you to access the 53GB as part of C:

Please note that changing the partition size may lead to unpredictable results.

One last option to consider, you can also use Norton Ghost to make an image of the partition on the disk.  You can then transfer the partition to a brand new disk that has much more space that the 53GB that you currently have free.  Consider this as an option as you are bound to run out of space again.

Regards,
M
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by:ingetic
ID: 16988041
you're right ....


fo less than $50 you can use a very good partition tool :
http://www.acronis.com/homecomputing/products/diskdirector/partitioning.html


other idea,
with symbolic links, you can link an entire folder (eg c:\program files or ..) to a formatted drive (without any letter)
(need to stop lot of process before moving the data)


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Expert Comment

by:bilbus
ID: 16988865
Leave the space as is, move all data to the D drive .. its really best
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by:binary_1001010
ID: 16990691
one thing to take note about disk partition tool, make sure your ram is not faulty. else your data will be loss when you merge the partition. download memtest before running partition tools.



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Expert Comment

by:vsg375
ID: 17166915
easiest way would be to use ghost.

1. Ghost your system partition "as is"
2. Repartition your drives as you wish
3. When restoring, you see the original size of the partition, and you have an option to define a new size.
4. Voila !

HTH
Cheers
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by:bilbus
ID: 17245733
you also could just mount the D drive into a empty ntfs folder on your C drive insted of doing all that.

resizing a part. is not supported by microsoft, so if you do it and you loose all your data your on your own
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