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CALs Question

I installed a Windows SBS 2003 Standard, completed the to-do list, everything works great.
We ONLY have the initial 5 CALs user/devices. I plan on adding another 5-7 computers to the domain, and matter of fact I already added two. My client plans on purchasing another 10 licenses within the next 2 months (they're nursing home financed mostly by public aid, and the state hasn't made a payment in over 5 months). Anyways, what will SBS 2003 do if I install other devices/users over the actual number of CALs? I don't want to sabotage the entire domain.

Thanks.
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gigelkent
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gigelkent
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1 Solution
 
rhickmottCommented:
No you can have 50 machines iirr in the domain on 5 CALs it just means that only 5 can concurrently connect to the server at once.

All it will do is simply increase this limit.

SBS is Exactly the same as Server 2003 Standard except...

Maximum of 75 CALs can be purchased.
Must be a Active Directory Domain Controller.
Cannot "Join" or "Trust" other domains.
Can be the ONLY server running SBS in a domain.

SBS CALs cost more than standard CALs because they cover Exchange, SQL Server etc in one CAL where with standard you need individual cals.
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ZadkinCommented:
Also curious about that,  with device CALs thinks are simple.  But with Users not,  I can have 50 users with 100 devices (desktop+laptop everyone) and say 60 accounts (50 normal + 10 doubled for Administrators and Power Users).  That should alll be covered by 50 user CALs as far as I know.
On the other extreme: one Administrator account for the external 24/365 team of 12 people could need 12 CALs if each one has its own workstation to do a remote session.  Maybe a remote session to a single device that does the remote session to the domain could solve that problem.    

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rhickmottCommented:
Client Licencing is done "Per Server" or "Per Seat"

Per Server licencing is the normal one and covers concurrent authenticated connections.
We have a copy of SBS running for a shared fax printer it has 5 CALs.

Approx 20 machines use across different sites but its not an issue as we have never had more than 5 at a time connect to it to send a print job. If 5 people for example load up the queue then the 6th person cannot it just says "Not Accessable" or if you access a share it says "Concurrent Connection Reached" I beleave or somethign similar and a nice big warning box pops up on the server.

How Licencing works with Active Directory though im not sure. We are not running a domain but I would assume that once a machine logs into the server it would use one CAL and I would imagine that would be constant usage but it could well just be that it releases the CAL after the login is successful and only reaquires if you access a network share etc for whatever reason. Something that I cant verify without testing.

But there should be no reason why you cant add 100 machines to a 5CAL server as long as there not being used concurrently.

http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2003/howtobuy/licensing/overview.mspx

From what I can understand (ive never used this method) Per Device licencing I beleave is done by the user. You only need a licence for each user but they can use as many devices as they want and they propogate between servers) so if you have a 100 workstations 5 users can log into all of them where with per server only 5 can login period.
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Jeffrey Kane - TechSoEasyPrincipal ConsultantCommented:
rhickmott,

You are not correct... SBS is NOT concurrent licensing.  Moreover, you have referenced Windows Server 2003 licensing, not SBS.

gigelkent,  licensing on SBS is a bit fuzzy... but the fact is that you need to have as many CALs as you have either users or devices.  The user model would be appropriate if people do NOT share the same computer.  The device model is better if more than one person shares a workstation.

Good article (actually it's a book chapter) on SBS Licensing: http://www.smbnation.com/downloads/AdvTopicsChap3.pdf

Jeff
TechSoEasy
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Jeffrey Kane - TechSoEasyPrincipal ConsultantCommented:
It's really too bad that you selected an answer that has wrong information in it.  But I guess you'll find out what is right when you try to implement this.

Jeff
TechSoEasy
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