Solved

Edit Cron Job

Posted on 2006-06-29
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Last Modified: 2010-04-20
Hi there

Dont know too much linux.

I want to add a new cron job to a currently running one. I found where it is stored: /var/spool/cron.

However when I try to edit it using 'vi' it tells me:

DO NOT EDIT THIS FILE - edit the master and reinstall.

Can I edit it? If not how do I go about doing it.

Many Thanks
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Question by:AndriesKeun
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Expert Comment

by:pjedmond
ID: 17008996
crontab -e

and you'll end up editing your crontab:)
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Expert Comment

by:pjedmond
ID: 17009000
Guess you ought to read:

man crontab

as well:)

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Author Comment

by:AndriesKeun
ID: 17009037
when i use crontab -e i also get the message: DO NOT EDIT THIS FILE - edit the master and reinstall.

in the directory: /var/spool/cron. there are a couple of files, one of which when i edit it there are two jobs in there, and i know for certain that these jobs run, however when i use crontab -e there are 5 jobs there, and the two that i know run are not in there. so you see, im a bit confused?



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Author Comment

by:AndriesKeun
ID: 17009128
sorry, my mistake, i just switched user.

but I still get the message: DO NOT EDIT THIS FILE - edit the master and reinstall. when i use cronatab -e, so yes or no answer, Is it cool if i edit this file? I cant afford to stuff it up.
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Accepted Solution

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pjedmond earned 125 total points
ID: 17009138
OK - looks like you have edited the wrong bits, and the system is now confused about which are the master files!

Setup should have crontabs in the:

/var/spool/cron/ folder as you have alluded to. There should be one for root, one for each user that uses cron, and probably a 'temporary' crontab which I believe is part of the cron calculating and optimisation process.

When you edit your crontab, you should *ONLY* do it via crontab! If you edited the /var/spool/crontab/user file then date/times will have become messed up. You need to edit your crontab, using:

crontab -e

This will edit your crontab. By saving this, I think that the date/times should be re-aligned and stop giving you the aforementioned error.

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Expert Comment

by:pjedmond
ID: 17009145
Yes - using "crontab -e" is the correct way to edit your user crontab.

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Author Comment

by:AndriesKeun
ID: 17009342
perferct, thanks
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