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System crash, TTY Read Only file system issue.

Posted on 2006-06-29
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Last Modified: 2008-01-09
After a reboot of SUSE Linux 9.0 server I attempt to log on as root and I get the following error:
FATAL: cannot change permissions of TTY: Read-only file system.
can anyone assist I cant find a fix anywhere.
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Question by:ITHCI
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by:pjedmond
ID: 17012473
1.    Recover any important data!
2.    Attempt to remount the file system. Look at /etc/fstab and attempt:

mount -o remount /

and the same process for the other partitions.

mount -as

may help?

3.     fsck (or equivalent for file system type all files systems

4.     Go and get a can of favourite beverage....*or* make a strong caffeinated drink because 3 often takes a long time.

5.     Pray.

6.     Possibly reinstall from scratch or replace HD - hopefully it won't come to this.

(   (()
(`-' _\
 ''  ''

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Assisted Solution

by:DonConsolio
DonConsolio earned 40 total points
ID: 17012500
reboot your system ans check if there are any file system errors

you might need a manual "fsck" on boot
or start from Knoppix or rescue CD and manually fsck the apropriate partition
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Author Comment

by:ITHCI
ID: 17012513
Thanks, I did the above steps already except for recover data as I am able to still mount the disk and read the files on it etc... if I use a SUSE rescue disk.  oh wait what is the "mount -as" ? I did a mount of the /dev/hda1 as rw and verified all fstab and mtab files seem to be correct with rw and defaults.

I also ran the fsch and all file systems came back good.

Any idea on what causes these issues? you said maybe failing hard disk?

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pjedmond earned 460 total points
ID: 17012958
mount -as

means mount all devices in the /etc/fstab.....but do it in a 'sloppy' fashion - i.e. let the program guess the file system and configuration rather than explicitly stating it.

>I also ran the fsch and all file systems came back good.

You are obviously good at praying!

>Any idea on what causes these issues? you said maybe failing hard disk?

A powersupply 'glitch' could just upset a read/write process and result in a disk error. Operating systems are so complex, that there is no way that anyone can really guarantee that it is absolutely 100% correct....and of course the possibility of a genuine hard drive error which may (or may not) be a precursor to failure of the drive. I'd definitely check that SMART is enabled for the drive concerned, and perhaps treat it with more caution in future. ....but as you have excellent backups, it doesn't really matter if the drive goes up in smoke anyway;)

(   (()
(`-' _\
 ''  ''
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by:ITHCI
ID: 17013295
Is running fsch a bad idea? generally? I may remove all necessary data and then rerun a mount -as as a last resort before complete rebuild.

Thanks,
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by:pjedmond
ID: 17013775
No - it's not a bad idea, in fact, the OS runs it as part of the boot process depending on the settings in the /etc/fstab

(   (()
(`-' _\
 ''  ''
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