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Microsoft vs Java Certification?

Posted on 2006-06-30
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I have a certification question:

I've been debating between getting a certification from Microsoft or Java.  

Based on yall's experience which is more beneficial?

Currently, I am familiar with Microsoft C#, but I am taking some classes on Java, it seems to be very similar to Java.  Anyway, I think I can get a good grasp of the language after studying for another 4 months.  

What is yalls take on this?

Thanks!!
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Question by:yanci1179
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by:InteractiveMind
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Which do you wish to work with in the future?
Java is big, and C# is growing.
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by:yanci1179
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really, I'll go where the market is going.  It's hard enough to get a job as it is.  Do you think Java is a good investment for know, and if C# grows go for that?

I'm just trying to market myself to the current demands.
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by:cookre
cookre earned 100 total points
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Bear in mind what follows are broad generalities for entry to intermediate level slots.  Your mileage may vary.

While there seem to be more jobs for Java types, and it seems as if anyone who can spell Java could land a job fairly quickly, C#.Net jobs tend to be higher paid corporate level slots with a bit more security and greater growth potential.

Note that although there seems to be a greater pool of Java people, given the demand, I'd say the competition level you'll face is about equal for both.

As far as certificates are concerned, remember what they show and who their targets are.  They show that you have book learning.  They say nothing about your ability to program.  Their target is the hiring manager who doesn't really understand programming and has to resort to a check list for a hiring decision.

If you have to have a job NOW, go with Java.  If you want to plan for the long term, go with C#.NET

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by:sathyagiri
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I guess JAVA would be the way to go atleast for the next 5 years with all the web services, SOA stuff going on
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by:dalsym
dalsym earned 50 total points
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Programming is a skill. The languages are just tools. Yes, that's a much over used and uber-generic statement, but I find it to be generally true.
If you are familiar with C#, then apply for C# jobs! Learn Java on the side to make yourself more marketable and varied.
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JoseParrot earned 200 total points
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Hi,

Java is Sun + IBM + Open + platform independent. Standard. Next year Java will be Java.
C# is Microsoft dependent. No standard. Next year C# will be dot Vista or other marketing stuff.

About certifications, they are very useful for inserting lines in your CV. In my concern CERTs prove that someone is good in filling x's in the right boxes. "How do you move a line in red from sheet 1 to sheet 9 in other file? (a) by pressing Alt+Shift+F7 twice, (b) by left doubleclicking an image" and so on. I never hired a person based on that (of course I have hired certified people, including in Java), but the criteria was based on good works presented, war stories (the problem was ... and the solution was ...), commitment (I had that mission and have insisted on it until was ready and good). These things count.  Please, I am not talking that certified people are .... no. It is good, but not deciding. If an ad asks just for someone "certified MPCXYZ", then you know, previously, that this job is pure "by-the-book", no chances to the creativity... My own experience...

Another very important thing: chose what you are comfortable with; chose what you like; chose what makes you happy. And go deep!

Sorry for so paternalist speach, but I say the same to my daugthers and they are happy persons.

Jose
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by:cookre
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>>C# is Microsoft dependent. No standard. Next year C# will be dot Vista or other marketing stuff.

<RANT>
Very true, but that's the biggest chunk of the market.  They know how to sell.  Other companies target technical folks.  Microsoft targets management.  It works.

Consider code repositories.  Subversion works just fine, thank you.  It's fast.  It's simple.  It's free.  Techies specify SVN (or whatever).  Management buys VSS.  And now management is buying Team Foundation.
</RANT>

But I'm not really complaining.  I've made a pretty decent living in the MS world.
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by:JoseParrot
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>>I've made a pretty decent living in the MS world.
Me too! BTW, still doing!
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by:v_karthik
v_karthik earned 50 total points
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I had Java programmer certification once. I believe if you understand one of Java and C# u can manage the other easily. All recruiters who looked for my programming skills (including those working with C#) recognized the Java cert., since C# is similar to Java.  Personally, I've worked enough with core Java, and I'm beginning to like the easy drag n drop features of C#. But I'll tell you this clearly - if u know Java, you can breeze through C# ... Perhaps the other way too, but I haven't experienced that.
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by:JoseParrot
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Well, yanci1179, you have brought a controversial subject to discussion but mature oppinions seems to point to an equilibrium in a couple of approaches. Maybe it is time to make a SWAT chart to summarize the highlights and look the picture at once.

Jose
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by:programmer1024
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Hmm..I think Microsoft Cert may pay off more. As impressive as JAVA Cert is, MS Cert is more impressive to me. But that is an opinion.
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by:programmer1024
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I know people who, during job interviews, were asked about MS Cert, usually not Java Cert. The interviewers seemed more interested in MS Cert.
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by:gregoryyoung
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>Java is Sun + IBM + Open + platform independent. Standard. Next year Java will be Java.
>C# is Microsoft dependent. No standard. Next year C# will be dot Vista or other marketing stuff.

ECMA 334/335 is not really a spec?

Mono/SSCLI?

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by:v_karthik
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>> I know people who, during job interviews, were asked about MS Cert, usually not Java Cert. The interviewers seemed more interested in MS Cert.

This sounds like a generalized assumption to me. Those who work with non-MS technology are likely to be more interested in Java cert than MS. Depends on the company you apply to. I don't think anyone can make a concrete statement like one of these will be the "preferred" cert.
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by:programmer1024
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>> I know people who, during job interviews, were asked about MS Cert, usually not Java Cert. The interviewers seemed more interested in MS Cert.

>>This sounds like a generalized assumption to me. Those who work with non-MS technology are likely to be more interested in Java cert than MS. Depends on the company you apply to. I don't think anyone can make a concrete statement like one of these will be the "preferred" cert.

It absolutely depends on the company. I was just saying that the particular companies were more interested in MS Cert. That's all. I'm not saying all companies or any particular industry.
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by:gregoryyoung
gregoryyoung earned 100 total points
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There is a reason people are more interested in MS certs.

MS has as part of its partner programs requirements to have certain numbers of certified people.

As an example .. In order to be a certified partner you need to have atleast 2 MCPs http://www.microsoft.com/learning/mcp/mcp/.

See https://partner.microsoft.com/global/40012109 for a bit more information on the basic partnerring. Note that this is just the basic partnerring but the more advanced partnerring follows similar patterns.

A quote from generating your points ..

"Microsoft Certified Professionals associated with your organization can earn from 1 to 3 Qualifying Partner Points based on their highest point-earning credential. Partner organizations that have achieved the full exam requirements for any MBS Competency specialization will receive 5 points per unique specialization. "

Since certifications are required for partnerring levels with Microsoft generally companies that are dealing with MS (which is a huge number when dealing with .NET) are very interested in what certifications you have as it may increase or decrease their possible partnerring level.

Cheers,

Greg Young
MVP - C#
http://codebetter.com/blogs/gregyoung
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by:yanci1179
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Thanks everybody.  I guess I'm kind left at square one.  this question should be worth way more than 500!!

:-)
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by:cookre
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Actually, you're well past square one.  You've a number of opinions and observations you didn't have before, and you're closer to that critical self-realization that, in the final analysis, you must make your own decisions.

If I were 35 years younger, I suspect I'd try to figure out my local job market and go with whichever I thought would bring me solvency soonest.

If I had to make a decision today, not being under any great pressure, I suspect I'd pop for both.
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by:v_karthik
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I looked at the "accepted answer" again, and I think it makes real good sense. While "xxx certified" entry in your CV gets you an appointment with an interviewer, it doesn't get you a job. All that matters is how capable you are in tackling problems using the technology... this is not decided by a certification.
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by:cookre
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That's a good point.  The resume gets you past the automated filters and HR types.  It's your face to face with a tech interviewer that counts most.

Well, almost.

85% of all jobs obtained are based on some form of word of mouth - someone you know puts in a good word for you or gets you the interview.

Interestingly enough, I got my last contract based on my record here at EE. After my interview, in my Thank You note I included several hundred selections from questions I'd answered here.  He later told me those collected posts were better than any  resume he had ever seen.

I wonder if that was pseudo word of mouth or pseudo certificate?
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