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disk partitioning setup

Posted on 2006-07-03
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Last Modified: 2010-05-18
I am about to install a fresh copy of linux on a new server that has an 80gig hdrive and a 250gig hdrive. I want to partition the disk so that everything is on the 80gig disk except the users directories that are under the /home directory I want the /home to be on the 250gig drive so that the users folders will automatically be created their. How do I do this? When I partition the drive can I just create the partitions like below and it will just do it? The system has 2gig of memory

partition the 80gig drive like this

/boot formatted to 1.2gig
/swap formatted to 2gig
/ formated with rest of the space

and the 250gig drive like this

/home  formatted to maximum of the 250gig drive

Any and all help and pointers appreciated
Thank you for your help ,

Matt
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Question by:heydude
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by:pjedmond
ID: 17034101
Those values are fine. However, more than 200MB for a boot partition is probably excessive.

With respect to the other sizes - They look sensible to me, although everyone has their own ideas about how to do this. The above will work fine, and there is no need to get too excited about getting it absolutely 'perfect'!

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by:heydude
ID: 17034309
I wasn't sure about the boot partition, I figured couldn't go wrong if I made it bigger. I will cut it down. The partitioning above will setup the /home directory correctly? When you set the / partition will also make a home directory? I was worried that when I set the /  partiton a /home directory would also be created their and it wouldn't use the /home directory that I create as the default /home share
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pjedmond earned 400 total points
ID: 17035217

>I wasn't sure about the boot partition, I figured couldn't go wrong if I made it bigger.

If you've got the space, then there's no problem. The reason I go for 200MB is that it's more than enough for 2 kernels if I ever need to swap...but even that's probably not required by you....so 200MB should be more than ample.

>When you set the / partition will also make a home directory?

The / partitioning only makes the / directory. If you wish, you could "mkdir /home" and put stuff in it. Once you mount the /home directory, this new /home will be superimposed over the original /home making the original unavailable. On unmounting /home, the files that you had created 'underneath' will become visible again.

>I was worried that when I set the /  partiton a /home directory would also be created their and it wouldn't use >the /home directory that I create as the default /home share

No need to worry unless you start messing amount with mount and umount. The partitions that you create during installation are normally mounted automatically as you desire during the startup process.
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by:rindi
ID: 17035984
I usually don't make the /boot larger than 100MB, and I also have more than one kernel. The kernel images used for booting usually don't get larger than 5MB with everything needed around it.

Depending on what distro you are installing, you will be given the option to select which mountpoint to assign to which partitions within the setup program, so that is usually no problem.
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