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Trying to access a dead laptop hard drive

Posted on 2006-07-05
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Last Modified: 2010-04-26
My customer brought me a dead laptop drive.  Tried several things, attached to other computers via connectors, spinrite, getdataback, put in freezer....
The bios does not recognize the drive.  Is there any way to boot the drive in the laptop and access it as a network drive
to get the data - even if the bios doesn't recognize it?
Thanks,
Al
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Question by:Alan Silverman
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Callandor earned 1000 total points
ID: 17042427
Nope - if the BIOS doesn't recognize it, the only other thing you can try is to replace the logic board from an identical drive - it needs to be the same PCB revision.  Otherwise, it's the big bucks solution with data recovery services, like www.gillware.com.
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by:Alan Silverman
ID: 17043389
How do you replace the logic board from an identical drive?
Thanks,
Al
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by:Callandor
ID: 17043726
You get a set of small torx screwdrivers (#7 or #8, I think, available from Home Depot online) and remove the screws holding the board to the drive.  The board is not connected to the drive; it just uses metal fingers to make contact.  You have to make sure the PCB is the same revision or this will fail for sure.  Usually, the full model# of the drive is a good indication of which revision it is.
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Author Comment

by:Alan Silverman
ID: 17044245
Thanks,
Al
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Author Comment

by:Alan Silverman
ID: 17044353
Hope it's not too late to ask another question.  Is there a high probability of screwing this up in such a way that afterward you won't be able to use the new hard drive either?
Thanks again,
Al  
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by:Callandor
ID: 17046233
Low probability of messing up the board, unless you mishandle the board.  I was unsuccessful in some transplants and was always able to use the new drive afterwards.
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Author Comment

by:Alan Silverman
ID: 17046605
Thanks again again,
Al
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