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How to change the local administrator password in SBS 2003

Posted on 2006-07-05
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Last Modified: 2013-12-04
When I try to logon to my SBS 2003 server, the only option in the domain list is our network domain...it doesn't appear that I can just logon to the local machine.  How can I logon locally?  Thanks.
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Question by:smalleysmalley
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by:oBdA
ID: 17050850
You can't. The domain *is* the local logon of a domain controller.
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by:smalleysmalley
ID: 17050935
I am trying to run a job that needs local Administrator rights.  It has the domain Admin rights, but it still won't connect.  I'm using the Administrator of the domain as my user ID.
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by:oBdA
ID: 17051948
The domain admins group has local adminstrator permissions. What exactly is failing and/or required?
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by:smalleysmalley
ID: 17052018
I'm trying to connect Backup Exec to my Exchange server to restore a file.  It keeps telling me access denied.  Their help site says to make sure the account has local Admin rights.  How come I can't logon to the actual server...just the domain?  Is that new is 2003?
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by:oBdA
ID: 17052080
That has been the case since NT domains. The domain controller's user database is the domain's user database, so there's no "local" logon possible.
Have you ever tried to read/write manually to the folder you're trying to restore the file to, just to check if the account you're using actually has the necessary permissions?
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by:smalleysmalley
ID: 17193238
I was able to get my file from a different location.  However, I am curious...  I have always thought you needed to have the local Admin password in case the domain goes down?  For example, my domain is called DOMAIN and my actual computer name is SERVER1.  Are you telling me that I can not logon to SERVER1?  I know with NT 4.0 I could...?  Thanks.
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oBdA earned 125 total points
ID: 17193384
No, there was no local logon on an NT4 domain controller either. You can logon locally on member servers, but not on domain controllers.
With AD DCs, there is sort of a local logon when you hit F8 during boot and boot into Directory Services Restore Mode; the AD services will not be started in this mode. You specify the password for this mode during dcpromo; if you want to change it, check here:
How To Reset the Directory Services Restore Mode Administrator Account Password in Windows Server 2003
http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=322672
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