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.net remoting and SQL Timezones

Hi All,
Could someone point me to a resource that would explain how when .net remoting calls Microsoft SQL for a  time object that is stored in the SQL database (Such as an appointment time).  If the SQL Server is in a different time zone from the user's computer, how does the time object handle this?

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Scott
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smpross
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smpross
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1 Solution
 
topdog770Commented:
What we typically do to address this issue of different time zones, is store the time values in the database using greenwhich time and then when loading the time in a client app, take the database greenwhich time add the localized timezone offset.

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smprossAuthor Commented:
Topdog,
Ok, but how do you know the local time zone of the computer?  Also we may have a need for a user to see what time the appointment is in cst even though they are in pst.

Any thoughts?

Scott
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topdog770Commented:
== Sample project and data ==
http://channel9.msdn.com/ShowPost.aspx?PostID=142586

== Some Basic Info ==
"Coding Best Practices Using DateTime in the .NET Framework"
http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/library/en-us/dndotnet/html/datetimecode.asp
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topdog770Commented:
I'd be tempted to create your own time entity that stored the date time in what ever format works best for your overall plans, throw in any conversion steps that you need and additionally store the appointments "time zone of creation" value so that you would be able to say things like this:

Michael created a 1 PM appointment July 06, 2006 PDT.  

for a viewer on the east coast you could display

Michael has a 4PM appointment( 1PM PDT) today, with Frank to discuss...

MyConceptOfATimeObject
{
  // universal time of appt
  // time zone of owner

  // common conversion and format functions
}

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smprossAuthor Commented:
Topdog,
It is funny that you say that... That is what we originally did, however, what I found was this:
The SQL Server was in EST.
The client was in CST time
The time was stored in the database in GMT.

When the GMT time was requested, the client would perform the conversion to CST.  However, what we found is that a secondary conversion occured that between the SQL server time zone and the Client.

Here is an example:

The appointment time was stored in GMT as 5:00 pm
The client (in CST) performed the conversion to 12:00 pm (- 5 hours for GMT)
It then performed a secondary conversion to 11: am to compensate for the difference between the SQL Server time zone and the client time zone.

Scott
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smprossAuthor Commented:
BTW, the MS article is just what I needed!  Thanks.

Scott
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