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Sort Command - Writing Output to File

Posted on 2006-07-07
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Last Modified: 2013-11-22
I'm attempting to use the sort command to sort a postfix transport.map file into alphabetical order. when I am logged into the box, and su'd I can go to the directory, and type "sort transport.map" and it correctly displays what I want to stdout. However when I try to write the output to a file it generates a blank file.

I've tried:

sort -o transport2.map transport.map
sort transport.map -o transport2.map
sort transport.map > transport2.map

 I've also tried all the previous using full path names. Any ideas what I am doing wrong?

Thanks in advance.
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Question by:kishvet
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7 Comments
 
LVL 15

Accepted Solution

by:
mr_egyptian earned 1500 total points
ID: 17088021
try:

sort --output=transport.sorted transport.map
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Author Comment

by:kishvet
ID: 17091714
Tried the above, still a blank text file is created named transport.sorted, im not quite sure why the output to file doesnt work when the outputt o stdout works just fine.
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LVL 15

Assisted Solution

by:mr_egyptian
mr_egyptian earned 1500 total points
ID: 17117667
Sorry fot the late reply, but the above works fine for me on a simple file of unsorted chars. What happens if you try a file such as:

-------cut-----------
g
a
d
c
b
f
e
-------cut-----------
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LVL 9

Assisted Solution

by:sda100
sda100 earned 500 total points
ID: 17128224
Hi kishvet,

Following on from mr_egyptian's suggestion, are you sure it is a 0-byte file that is created, or is it just lots of leading blanks?

It may seem dumb, but are you logged on as root or running under sudo?

Steve :)
0
 
LVL 62

Expert Comment

by:gheist
ID: 17151971
Your disk is almost full. It has hit 10% of disk accesible only by root. If not in that directory then in users home, /var or /tmp.
0
 

Author Comment

by:kishvet
ID: 17154390
Sorry For Late Response Myself, I was away for a week.

The Short file with letters works, generates the output file correctly.

It was exaclty the same size as the initial file.
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Author Comment

by:kishvet
ID: 17154428
I feel dumb now :/

I found out what the problem was, i had blank lines throughout the file, due to its length, to break it up for readability. What i didnt think of was that sort was putting all these blank lines on top, pushing the text off the standard screen. I viewed this as a blank file and deleted it every time.

Going to Split Points Since I wasted Your Time.
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