Solved

Cisco Router

Posted on 2006-07-07
4
684 Views
Last Modified: 2013-11-29
Hi all.

We currently are looking into possibly getting a Cisco Router but were told that because we have DSL it would not be good, that Cisco Routers are meant for T1 line connections.

Is this true? If so, why?

Thanks in advance.
0
Comment
Question by:printmedia
4 Comments
 
LVL 9

Expert Comment

by:NYtechGuy
ID: 17062176

This is not true at all.  Cisco makes networking devices, the medium - as in T-1, DSL, Frame Relay, OC3, etc - does not matter in the least.  In fact, Cisco makes DSL modems.  

Frequently however, your DSL provider will supply the modem.  The output of this modem would be 10/100 ethernet - and to that you would simply connect a standard ethernet router.

I would highly suggest Cisco products for your application.

Thanks,

Justin
0
 
LVL 2

Expert Comment

by:chuckrox
ID: 17062462
What the person probably meant is that Cisco routers are about as high end as you can go - and it might be overkill for your application. What is the rest of your network setup?
ISP Provider? What kind of DSL connection?
How many computers / servers will be behind this router?
0
 
LVL 79

Accepted Solution

by:
lrmoore earned 250 total points
ID: 17062760
With DSL you can get a bridged modem from the provider that hands off Ethernet to you. When this is the case, you don't need a router you can use a firewall such as the Cisco PIX or ASA.
You can get routers with DSL modem modules from low-end 800 series to high-end as much as you want to spend.
With or without wireless, too..
Built-in 4-port 10/100 switch, or single/dual FastEthernet interface
Example low end:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/routers/ps380/products_data_sheet0900aecd8028a976.html
Example mid range:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps6184/index.html
0
 
LVL 22

Expert Comment

by:Rick Hobbs
ID: 17063357
If it is a business application, Cisco is the best known/most widely supported  hardware you can purchase.  If it is a home application, if you can afford it. Cisco is still the way to go.   If not, there are many less $$$ options.

If it is a small business, follow lrmoore's advice on which specific model to use.
0

Featured Post

Netscaler Common Configuration How To guides

If you use NetScaler you will want to see these guides. The NetScaler How To Guides show administrators how to get NetScaler up and configured by providing instructions for common scenarios and some not so common ones.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Suggested Solutions

Join Greg Farro and Ethan Banks from Packet Pushers (http://packetpushers.net/podcast/podcasts/pq-show-93-smart-network-monitoring-paessler-sponsored/) and Greg Ross from Paessler (https://www.paessler.com/prtg) for a discussion about smart network …
For many of us, the  holiday season kindles the natural urge to give back to our friends, family members and communities. While it's easy for friends to notice the impact of such deeds, understanding the contributions of businesses and enterprises i…
Viewers will learn how to connect to a wireless network using the network security key. They will also learn how to access the IP address and DNS server for connections that must be done manually. After setting up a router, find the network security…
Viewers will learn how to properly install and use Secure Shell (SSH) to work on projects or homework remotely. Download Secure Shell: Follow basic installation instructions: Open Secure Shell and use "Quick Connect" to enter credentials includi…

825 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question