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Cisco Router

Posted on 2006-07-07
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Last Modified: 2013-11-29
Hi all.

We currently are looking into possibly getting a Cisco Router but were told that because we have DSL it would not be good, that Cisco Routers are meant for T1 line connections.

Is this true? If so, why?

Thanks in advance.
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Question by:printmedia
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4 Comments
 
LVL 9

Expert Comment

by:NYtechGuy
ID: 17062176

This is not true at all.  Cisco makes networking devices, the medium - as in T-1, DSL, Frame Relay, OC3, etc - does not matter in the least.  In fact, Cisco makes DSL modems.  

Frequently however, your DSL provider will supply the modem.  The output of this modem would be 10/100 ethernet - and to that you would simply connect a standard ethernet router.

I would highly suggest Cisco products for your application.

Thanks,

Justin
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LVL 2

Expert Comment

by:chuckrox
ID: 17062462
What the person probably meant is that Cisco routers are about as high end as you can go - and it might be overkill for your application. What is the rest of your network setup?
ISP Provider? What kind of DSL connection?
How many computers / servers will be behind this router?
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lrmoore earned 250 total points
ID: 17062760
With DSL you can get a bridged modem from the provider that hands off Ethernet to you. When this is the case, you don't need a router you can use a firewall such as the Cisco PIX or ASA.
You can get routers with DSL modem modules from low-end 800 series to high-end as much as you want to spend.
With or without wireless, too..
Built-in 4-port 10/100 switch, or single/dual FastEthernet interface
Example low end:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/routers/ps380/products_data_sheet0900aecd8028a976.html
Example mid range:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps6184/index.html
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LVL 22

Expert Comment

by:Rick Hobbs
ID: 17063357
If it is a business application, Cisco is the best known/most widely supported  hardware you can purchase.  If it is a home application, if you can afford it. Cisco is still the way to go.   If not, there are many less $$$ options.

If it is a small business, follow lrmoore's advice on which specific model to use.
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