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Convert array to a dictionary of counts?

Is there a built-in function that converts an array of strings into a dictionary, where each key is a unique element in the array, and each value is the number of times that the corresponding key appeared in the array? I wrote such a function (below), but I would prefer to use either a built-in function, or at least a function from a common library.

def setToMap(array):
    dict = {}
    for element in array:
        if element in dict:
            dict[element] += 1
        else:
            dict[element] = 1
    return dict


Thanks!
0
BerkeleyJeff
Asked:
BerkeleyJeff
2 Solutions
 
RichieHindleCommented:
No, I don't believe there's a built-in function to do this.

Most people build up their own module of such functions, and import that module into each of their projects.
0
 
peprCommented:
In fact, you are implementing the multi-set (or bag). Using the dictionary type, which is very efficient in Python, is fine for that. Even the Sets module--the predecessor of built-in set type--implemented the sets  using the dictionary type. The comment says "This module implements sets using dictionaries whose values are ignored."

I personally would call the function bagFromSeq(seq), because you can iterate through any sequence of whatever the same way. I would also not use the identifier dict for the dictionary, because you are masking the same name of a built-in type.

You can even think about building your class Bag(dict):  if it makes sense in your case. Otherwise, you code looks fine.
0
 
BerkeleyJeffAuthor Commented:
Thanks for the suggestions. In response, I've rewritten the code and moved it to a seperate module:

def accumulate(hash, key, value):
    if key in hash:
        hash[key] += value
    else:
        hash[key] = value

def multisetCounts( multiset ):
    counts = {}
    for element in multiset:
        accumulate(counts, element, 1)
    return counts


Is there anything further that could be improved? I'm pretty new to Python, coming from Perl. Btw/in Perl this type of routine could be written in one short line:

map {counts{$_}++} multiset;
 

I'm surprised Python (a successor to Perl, known for its elegance) would require 5x as much code.
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RichieHindleCommented:
For what it's worth, here's how I'd spell it:

def count_items(seq):
    counts = {}
    for s in seq:
        counts[s] = counts.get(s, 0) + 1
    return counts

if __name__ == '__main__':
    TEST = ['red', 'green', 'blue', 'green', 'pink', 'red', 'green']
    print count_items(TEST)

And also for what it's worth, one of the reasons Python is more elegant than Perl is that you can't express four line's worth of code in one line.  8-)
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ramromconsultant Commented:
counts={}
map(lambda x:counts.update({x:counts.get(x,0)+1}),seq)
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BerkeleyJeffAuthor Commented:
Thanks! It was the 'get' function that I was looking for.
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