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Easiest way to increase size of system partition on Windows 2003 Server

Posted on 2006-07-10
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I have a secondary domain controller (running Windows 2003 server) whose system volume is running out of space.  (My server is equipped with a simple RAID-1, with a 7GB system volume (dynamic) and a 128GB data volume (dynamic). Any suggestions on what would be the quickest, least painful way for me to increase the size of the system volume?

I've read several other articles, and it seems like I have 3 options:  (1) rebuild the server with a larger system volume, (2) use some sort of 3rd party partitioning tool, or (3) create an image of the system volume and restore it to a new, larger volume.

Option (3) seems the most appealing.  I was thinking I could add two more physical disk drives, configure those as a RAID-1, and then restore the system volume image to it.  Is this the best option?  And, if it is, what 3rd party software would I use to create/restore the image?




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Question by:perfectionmachinery
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Steve Knight earned 250 total points
ID: 17077536
Before you go down that route, 7Gb should be enough.  Have you made sure there is nothing on the system volume you could move instead for now, few suggestions:

1. Page file.  Move it to D: --> Right click My Computer, Properties, Advanced, Peformance Settings, Advanced, Virtual Memory, Change.
   Enter 0 for c: drive min and max and select "No paging file".  Enter same values as before in to D: min and max or "system managed size".

2. Search for all files over 50Mb sya using Start |Seach |What size is it | At least 50000

3. Search for *.tmp files

4. Check your printers do not have large amount of print jobs 'stuck' in queues.
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by:dhoustonie
ID: 17077568
Great Blog posting by Vlad Mazek:
http://www.vladville.com/2006/06/ntfs-partitioning-tool.html

Need to repartition your NTFS volume - resize, delete, move, format or delete for free? Even on a server? Check out Gparted.

Not a day goes by without someone that just got their shiny new Dell server with a 160 GB hard drive… and a 12 GB C:\ partition. Resizing the NTFS partition then becomes an interesting task of finding a piece of software that is still up to date yet certified for resizing volumes on a server. The process becomes so ambiguous that most just blow up the whole machine for a repartition and reinstall. It’s a frustrating search with many wrong turns and steep fees but there is this great tool that you can use, for free, to do it yourself. Yes, it works on servers. Yes, it works on domain controllers. Yes, it works on NTFS. Using Linux to fix Windows, what a concept. Check out this review of Gparted and burn yourself an iso for free.

http://surfnet.dl.sourceforge.net/sourceforge/gparted/gparted-livecd-0.2.5-1.iso


David Houston

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by:perfectionmachinery
ID: 17266401
Thank you for the feedback.

I can't say that I agree that 7Gb would be enough for a Windows system volume.  But I do agree, however, that the least disruptive thing I can do is clean up the existing system volume to recover disk space and then install any new software on the data volume.  So that's what I did.  Long term, it looks like I'll simply have to rebuild the server with a larger system volume.

As for the Gparted software, it is an interesting utility, but I didn't get the impression that it was any less risky than any other partitioning software.  Given the importance of this server, I didn't seem wise to try it.
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