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An interesting observation re: VB6 & Dictionaries

Posted on 2006-07-10
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Last Modified: 2013-12-25
I use dictionaries extensively to keep track of data within the program.

In this case, I was using the dictionary to determine which records should be deleted.

Unfortunetley, all records were being deleted (test only, thank goodness!).

This is what I learned:

If you are stupid, like I was apparently, and get the sequence mixed up just a wee little  bit...

vKey = gRecord.Field("MasterKey")
sDictData = gDict.Item(vKey)
If Not gDict.Exists(vKey) Then SkipStuff
... process deletes

----------------

That code would ADD the value to the data dictionary, regardless of whether it is there or not!

vKey = gRecord.Field("MasterKey")
If Not gDict.Exists(vKey) Then SkipStuff
   sDictData = gDict.Item(vKey)
   ... process deletes

---------------

This works fine.

Thought I would share this... and perhaps,  if someone has an observation to share back, that would be equally interesting.
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Question by:merydion
5 Comments
 
LVL 143

Expert Comment

by:Guy Hengel [angelIII / a3]
ID: 17078870
This is a typical Programming Logic Error, which is quite difficult to debug if code is not commented.
please comment the code so you and others will understand it later also.
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Author Comment

by:merydion
ID: 17084286
The code is commented, I just didn't do so here for brevity.
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Accepted Solution

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JR2003 earned 20 total points
ID: 17111262
See also:

http://www.microsoft.com/technet/scriptcenter/guide/sas_scr_ybdz.mspx?mfr=true

Inadvertently Adding a Key to a Dictionary

One potential problem in using the Dictionary object is that any attempt to reference an element that is not contained in the Dictionary does not result in an error. Instead, the nonexistent element is added to the Dictionary. Consider the following script sample, which creates a Dictionary, adds three key-item pairs to the Dictionary, and then attempts to echo the value of a nonexistent item, Printer 4:

When the script tries to echo the value of the nonexistent item, no run-time error occurs. Instead, the new key, Printer 4, is added to the Dictionary, along with the item value Null. As a result, the message box shown in Figure 4.9 appears.

Figure 4.9 Message Resulting from Inadvertently Adding a Key to a Dictionary

To avoid this problem, check for the existence of a key before trying to access the value of the item.

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