Solved

Mount permanently

Posted on 2006-07-12
1
399 Views
Last Modified: 2012-06-27
Running ProFTPd, so I am creating directories on which I do a mount --bind so that users can have access to different directories on different mounts of the file system from within their /home/ directory.

Question: Is there a command line switch that will automatically add the mount to fstab?

If not, how do I add this command to fstab:

mount --bind /mnt/server/some/dir /home/userdir

?

Thanks in advance.
0
Comment
Question by:DrDamnit
1 Comment
 
LVL 22

Accepted Solution

by:
pjedmond earned 500 total points
ID: 17091649
Before you can run this command, you need to have mounted the 'server' concerned? I presume that this will be required to run once at startup? If so, add the above mount command to the /etc/rc.local (or equivalent). The commands in this file are run after the /etc/fstab directives have been carried out, and all the normal processes have started.

That should achieve what you require.

(   (()
(`-' _\
 ''  ''
0

Featured Post

Simplifying Server Workload Migrations

This use case outlines the migration challenges that organizations face and how the Acronis AnyData Engine supports physical-to-physical (P2P), physical-to-virtual (P2V), virtual to physical (V2P), and cross-virtual (V2V) migration scenarios to address these challenges.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

rdate is a Linux command and the network time protocol for immediate date and time setup from another machine. The clocks are synchronized by entering rdate with the -s switch (command without switch just checks the time but does not set anything). …
I. Introduction There's an interesting discussion going on now in an Experts Exchange Group — Attachments with no extension (http://www.experts-exchange.com/discussions/210281/Attachments-with-no-extension.html). This reminded me of questions tha…
Learn how to get help with Linux/Unix bash shell commands. Use help to read help documents for built in bash shell commands.: Use man to interface with the online reference manuals for shell commands.: Use man to search man pages for unknown command…
Learn how to find files with the shell using the find and locate commands. Use locate to find a needle in a haystack.: With locate, check if the file still exists.: Use find to get the actual location of the file.:

770 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question