making the move to 2005

We are a small development team that currently maintains projects in VB6 and writes and maintains projects in .Net 2003.  We are contemplating the move to .Net 2005.  What issues will we face with existing 2003 projects completed and in development?  What's the downside, if any?  What version (Pro or Team or another) is best.

Thank you.
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g_johnsonAsked:
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Shakti109Connect With a Mentor Commented:
The version will depend on what features you wish to use.

Versions below Pro do not include the database type projects. If you are going to build DTS, or other database objects (CLR .dll's for sql 2005 for example), then I'd reccomend at least pro.

If you are currently using/coding in .net 2003, then the move to 2005 will be easy as you get many new capabilities : Things like being able to have a web-service update applications when they start (new deployment/update wizard), generics, and many many more.

When moving projects from 2003 to 2005, the move will be far less painful (and less complicated) than bringing projects from say VB6 and trying to convert them to 2003 (which often generated more work than re-writing from scratch).

In 2005, there are many more options to further improve code efficiency and good programming skills (compiler options), and these may generate warnings/errors from older .net 2003 code.

Things like : Me.FormBorderStyle = FormBorderStyle.None

Will generate a warning/error. To "correct it", you simply fully qualify the property name :

 Me.FormBorderStyle = Windows.Forms.FormBorderStyle.None

Other than things like this, there are no huge/glaring conversion issues from .net 2003 - 2005.
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Jeff CertainConnect With a Mentor Commented:
As Shakti mentioned, most of your code will port nicely.

You may, however, find that some projects dependent on third-party DLLs require an updated DLL. Also, web apps are significantly different, and will require a fair bit of work to port.

In addition, you will find that generics (System.Collections.Generic) will help you write more efficient code faster. Snippets help reduce cut-and-paste and repetitive code. The class designer makes visual design of your class structure quite eacy (and it even generates stub code for you). Any of the team edition versions have unit testing integrated into the IDE.

There is an increased emphasis on security in 2005 (see the new System.Security namespace).

There's also a free tool called Refactor! that makes it much easier to refactor your code.

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g_johnsonAuthor Commented:
can you continue your .Net2003 projects in the 2005 ide and continue to run them on the 1.1 framework, or do you need to "port" them and use the 2.0 framework.  can they exists side-by-side like 2003 does with VB6?

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Jeff CertainCommented:
The IDEs will exist side-by-side, as will the Frameworks. However, if you're developing in 2005, they compile against the 2.0 Framework (so you can't develop an application in VS2005 that uses 1.1)
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