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Too many kernel images on boot

Posted on 2006-07-14
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Last Modified: 2013-12-16
I'm using Kubuntu Dapper Drake (a great system) for home use and have updated it regularly. However, I now have several old Kernel images displayed in the Grub boot manager. I'm never going to use them but have no idea how to get rid of them? The simpler and more straight-forward the solution the better.
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Question by:mark_667
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by:pjedmond
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Edit your /boot/grub/grub.conf

Obviously be careful with what you delete but there will be an entry block associated with each kernel version. You can delte the 'blocks in this file associated with the kernels that you no longer whic to use. Obviously do this with care as you can potentially make your system unbootable doing this.

You can then delete the associated files in the /boot/ directory. Again, do with care.

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by:rindi
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You could just comment out the unwanted entries in grub.conf with the # and then once you are satisfied everything works delete these lines.

As pjedmond advises, also delete the associated files in the /boot folder, and don't forget the the associated /lib/modules/NotWantedKernelVersions, as these can use up a lot of space.
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slyong earned 50 total points
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In Ubuntu/Kubuntu:

Use your favorite editor to edit the /boot/grub/menu.lst file. I use gedit and type the following command.
$ sudo gedit /boot/grub/menu.lst

or better still remove the unused/old Linux kernels:

go into synaptic. and search "linux-image". select all installed ones
but the latest and the press apply.
(Installed packages' checkboxes are gray)
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by:mark_667
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I couldn't find a grub.conf file and I checked the 'show hidden files' option. I did, however, find the menu.lst sylong mentioned. He gets the points as he gave the easiest way of doing it though all responses are much appreciated.
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